Concurrent Sessions: Friday, July 10

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Concurrent Session: Telepractice Doesn’t Work: Uncovering the Truth

Melissa McCarthy
University of Newcastle, Australia

Have you tried telepractice, but still aren’t getting the best outcomes for families? The truth is most telepractice programs are ineffective. Join this session to discover mistakes that frustrate practitioners and lead to ineffective telepractice sessions. Learn strategies to avoid these mistakes, improve your sessions and achieve better outcomes for families.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe common mistakes that reduce the effectiveness of telepractice
  • Identify one priority area for improvement that will result in better outcomes for families who use telepractice.
  • Assess own telepractice services to create an action plan for delivering an effective telepractice program.
Concurrent Session: From NEAR to HEAR: Trauma-Informed Practice

Elizabeth Rosenzweig
Private Practice/Stern College, New York, N.Y.

NEAR science examines the ways in which Neurochemistry, Epigenetics, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and Resilience affect human development. How can auditory-verbal practitioners apply this research to help us bridge NEAR to HEAR: Holistic Emotionally Intelligent Auditory-Verbal Rehabilitation? This presentation will equip participants with tools to provide trauma-informed practice.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Define and describe the aspects of NEAR science.
  • List three adaptations to auditory-verbal practice that promote resilience and healthy parent-child attachment.
  • Identify the psychobiological sequelae of childhood adversity and how they affect speech, language and listening development.

11:35 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.

Concurrent Session: Collaborate and Listen: Partners in Inclusive Education

Elizabeth Gaffney
Shelley Mathay
All Ears! Listening and Language Center, Houston, Texas

Auditory-verbal principles support that children who are deaf and hard of hearing learn language from their peers who have typical hearing who serve as natural social and language role models. Inclusive educational practices are one piece of the programming puzzle that gives children the language exposure necessary to build connections.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify qualities of a language rich environment.
  • Outline criteria used to determine optimal inclusive education partners.
  • Identify skills that would indicate beneficial inclusion practices.
Concurrent Session: Speech Babble: Do You Copy?

Peyton Stephens
Amy Huddleston
The Center for Hearing and Speech, Houston, Texas

Speech babble is a multifaceted approach for targeting listening and articulation for children with hearing loss. In this session, the theory and purposes of speech babble will be discussed. Instruction will be provided on the implementation of speech babble in the therapy setting, including strategies for effectively planning and executing speech babble.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Gain understanding of the foundational theory of speech babble.
  • Identify the three different types of speech babble and their underlying purposes.
  • Identify appropriate speech babble targets for a given case study and list the steps necessary for implementation within the therapy setting.
Concurrent Session: Experiences that Ignite Parent and Child Self-Efficacy

Michael Douglas
MED-EL Corporation

Our approach to counseling and service provision can greatly impact how well information is applied outside of the intervention environment. This presentation will uncover effective methods for increasing self-efficacy while considering a model of working memory, agents of change, and factors that contribute to recall and subsequent action.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Explain a model of working memory that defines how we hear, see and store information.
  • Describe a process-based approach to facilitate change in the behavior of others.
  • List at least three interactive learning experiences to facilitate a change in self-efficacy for family members.

12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Concurrent Session: Parents’ Use of Mealtime Conversation Techniques

Elaine Smolen
Maria Hartman
Columbia University Teachers College, New York, N.Y.

How do parents elicit language during home routines? Using LENA technology, this study investigated parents’ use of conversation techniques and explicit instruction during mealtimes in the home environments of preschoolers with hearing loss. Links between these techniques and children’s vocabulary will be presented along with a qualitative analysis of sample conversations.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Define higher- and lower-level conversation techniques used by parents with their children with hearing loss.
  • Explain the characteristics of parents’ use of conversation techniques during mealtimes with their preschoolers with hearing loss.
  • Discuss the relation between parents’ use of conversation techniques and their children’s vocabulary development.
Concurrent Session: Developing Verbal Humour in Children Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Emma Burton
Louise Ashton
Auditory Verbal UK, London

What’s so funny? Parents often report that verbal humour seems to ‘go over their child’s head’. Join us for an interactive session, using research and video analysis, to explore the key stages of verbal humour development and learn effective strategies for supporting children who are deaf or hard of hearing to appreciate and create verbal humour.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Explain the stages of verbal humour development from infancy to school age, and the building blocks required for mastery of each stage.
  • Discuss research relating to the impact of hearing loss on the development of verbal humour.
  • Apply strategies to support parents in nurturing their child’s verbal humour skills through everyday conversations and playful interaction.
Concurrent Session: Applying A Social Ecological Model to Early Intervention

Tamala Bradham
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.

Barbara Hecht
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech, Rowley, Mass.

Ronda Rufsvold
CCHAT Center Sacramento, Rancho Cordova, Calif.

This presentation will provide a conceptual framework for early intervention services following hearing loss identification using McLeroy’s ecological-model. An ecological approach focuses on both the individual-level and population-level of social determinants of health outcomes. Participants will leave with a road map for success that can be applied in their practices.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Recite research that supports the JCIH recommendation of confirming hearing loss in children by 3 months of age and enrollment in appropriate early intervention by 6 months of age from health care and education professions with expertise in hearing loss in infants and young children.
  • Describe the conceptual framework in relation to the outcomes of children who are deaf and hard of hearing based on qualitative and quantitative data.
  • Apply at least one concept shared from the conceptual framework that will impact the delivery of intervention treatment to children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Concurrent Session: I Want, Therefore I Can: Self-Advocacy Foundations

Annie Lederfeind
Jacqueline DeGroat
Auditory Oral School of New York, Brooklyn, N.Y.

The development of self-esteem and intrinsic motivation to succeed underlies the child’s use of self-advocacy. We will explore the path from self-awareness to self-advocacy, share strategies to develop self-esteem and motivation and show videos of our work at the Auditory Oral School of New York. A revised self-advocacy checklist will be distributed.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand the relationship of self-esteem and intrinsic motivation to actions of self-advocacy.
  • Describe steps leading from self-awareness to self-advocacy.
  • Identify strategies to develop intrinsic motivation appropriate for their own setting.
Concurrent Session: Sensory Play to Maximize Listening and Speaking

Louise Ashton
Auditory Verbal UK

Many children love to get sticky, slimy and covered in paint! Join us to explore how to use simple, low-cost, sensory play to enhance listening and spoken language. Learn how sensory play benefits development and come away with a range of ideas for your sessions with children 0-5 years old.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Explore current thinking on how sensory play can contribute to developing cognition and language, and particularly how it applies to children with a hearing loss.
  • Be able to explain the stages of play development through exploring sensory materials and generate novel, simple, low-cost sensory play ideas for children ages 0-5 years old to maximise listening and spoken language.
  • Be equipped to guide and coach parents to use sensory play as a vehicle for maximizing their child’s listening and spoken language through use of a framework to make play functional, fun and conversational.
Concurrent Session: PEPP: A Preventive Education Program for Parents

Ulrika Löfkvist
University of Oslo Karolinska Institute, Oslo, Norway

The Preventive Education Program for Parents (PEPP) model will be presented in more detail together with preliminary data from a pilot study. PEPP could contribute that fewer families will have to wait for immediate and specialized support after diagnosis of their child’s hearing loss.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand how early dyadic and verbal interaction patterns affect spoken language abilities in infants with hearing loss.
  • Learn how empowerment of parents and awareness of adult communicative behavior is affected by individual coaching and visual reinforcement (LENA charts, video, mind-maps).
  • Be able to explain why it is important with preventive education programs like PEPP for parents of children with hearing loss.

2:40 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.

Concurrent Session: Teens with Hearing Loss

Bailey Clay
Amy Huddleston
The Center for Hearing and Speech, Houston, Texas

This presentation details the creation and execution of a leadership program for teens with hearing loss. The program develops self-advocacy and professional communication skills through opportunities to collaborate with peers and mentors, complete self-directed tasks and act as role models while establishing a passion for local civic engagement and volunteering.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Be able to create a program to train teens with hearing loss for volunteer and workplace programs in their local community.
  • Identify benefits of volunteering related to self esteem.
  • Identify benefits of teaching professional communication to develop workplace readiness skills in teens with hearing loss.
Concurrent Session: Improving LSL Systems – Bridges to Collaboration

Teri Ouellette
Susan Sehgal
St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf, Indianapolis, Ind.

Bethany Colson
Indiana Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education, Indianapolis, Ind.

As professionals we are called to support system change that benefits our families and promotes access to listening and spoken language services. This presentation reviews the experiences of professionals in Indiana promoting collaborative work in areas of legislative advocacy, collaborative assessment and administration of diverse teams.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Defend participation in collaborative groups to advance listening and spoken language objectives.
  • Relate listening and spoken language concerns effectively in a political arena.
  • Justify listening and spoken language techniques in a diverse group of professionals.

Concurrent Sessions: Saturday, July 11

2:25 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.

Concurrent Session: Words Matter in Picture Book Readings

Bridget Scott-Weich
Angela Stokes
John Tracy Center/ Mount Saint Mary’s University, Los Angeles, Calif.

Does targeted word choice embedded in joint story book reading improve vocabulary learning and adult- child conversational turns? Using the LENA device (Language ENvironment Analysis), the vocabulary and language exchanges in preschool children with typical hearing and hearing loss were measured and analyzed before and after joint picture book readings.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn how to increase parent awareness in joint book reading and its effects on fast mapping in preschool children.
  • Compare the conversational interactions recorded by LENA (Language ENvironment Analysis) of parents and preschool children before and after multiple joint story/picture book readings.
  • Formulate a plan to guide parents in selecting and targeting words for specialized vocabulary learning.
Concurrent Session: Behavioral Health in Children with Hearing Loss

Ivette Cejas
University of Miami Ear Institute, Miami, Fla.

This session is designed to address the importance of assessing and addressing mental health in children with hearing loss and their families. This session will address screening methods that can be utilized in your clinical practice, as well as when you need to refer to a mental health specialist.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Discuss the benefits and role of a psychologist as part of an audiology team.
  • Describe assessments of behavioral and emotional functioning that can be incorporated into your clinical practice.
  • Identify when families should be referred to a psychologist or mental health specialist.

3:05 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.

Concurrent Session: How to Engage Preschoolers Using Chapter Books

Carol Flexer
The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio

Sarah Carpenter
Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children, San Antonio, Texas

Grade-level competence in literacy is a desired outcome for all children. One step in the brain and literacy development process is reading chapter books aloud to preschoolers. This presentation will use video tapes to demonstrate how to engage preschoolers with hearing loss in listening to and conversing about chapter books.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Organize a list of chapter books that would be appropriate for preschoolers who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Explain the process of introducing chapter books to preschoolers.
  • Describe how chapter books can be used to teach continuity and sequencing of a story, over time.
Concurrent Session: Informational Counseling: What, Why, When?

Ellen Rhoades
Independent Consultant, Plantation, Fla.

Rachel Glade
University of Arkansas, Fayettville, Ark.

Participants in this course will discuss the following questions: What is counseling? What is informational counseling (IC)? Why is IC important for auditory-verbal practice? What micro-skills are needed for effective IC? What are the topics that should be integral to IC? How can auditory-verbal practitioners incorporate IC into their practice/program?

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify at least five micro-skills needed for effective informational counseling.
  • Identify the varied content/topics integral to informational counseling and discuss the rationale for each.
  • Share/explain their functional strategies for integrating the identified content areas into their respective auditory-verbal practice.
Concurrent Session: Unilateral Hearing Loss and Cochlear Implants

Sandra Hancock
The Children’s Cochlear Implant Center at UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.

This presentation will review early outcomes for children with unilateral hearing loss who received a cochlear implant (CI) and describe a therapy protocol for this population, including how to set up technology to provide auditory stimuli isolated to the CI ear.

Learning Objectives

During this session, participants will:

  • List early outcomes for children with unilateral hearing loss participating in a clinical trial and received a cochlear implant under and investigational device exemption (IDE).
  • Describe how to set up technology to isolate the cochlear implant ear for therapy with children with unilateral hearing loss who receive a cochlear implant.
  • List possible recommendations for children with unilateral hearing loss who receive a cochlear implant.
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