Concurrent Sessions: Monday, July 1

11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Concurrent Session: PARENT SUPPORT GROUPS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

V. Daboo and F. Jagmag
VConnect Foundation

Monday, July 1 / 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Parent Support Groups in Developing Countries

Challenges faced by parents of children with hearing differences in developing countries are perhaps far greater than those who live in countries with more resources. Parent support groups in such countries need to adopt an approach that goes beyond mere emotional and social support. VConnect Foundation is a parent support group in India that has adopted a holistic approach and is a strong case study for the development of parent support groups in dveloping nations. The session will cover various aspects of the holistic approach and how it benefits parents, especially in the lower socio-economic strata.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:
Learners will learn about a range of challenges faced by parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing with differences in lesser developed countries.

Concurrent Session: ASSESSMENTS: WHO? WHAT? WHY? HOW?

Tamala Bradham and  T. Houston
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Monday, July 1 / 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Assessments: Who? What? Why? How?

Assessment is a critical first step in determining the communicative and academic needs of children identified with hearing loss. This case-based session will provide insight on measures to consider, how to communicate findings, and will provide practical information to consider in speech-language-auditory assessments.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:
Learners will identify key components of a comprehensive assessment.

Concurrent Session: FROM DOCILE TO DESTRUCTIVE: THERAPY WITH SIBLINGS

J. Wanek and A. Noyola
Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children

Monday, July 1 / 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

From Docile to Destructive: Therapy with Siblings

Within various family dynamics, there is a spectrum of sibling behaviors that professionals may observe, ranging from docile to destructive. A spectrum of behaviors welcomes a spectrum of possibilities for session planning. This presentation will focus on the importance of family-centered intervention, particularly in regards to the inclusion of siblings in therapy.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to describe the importance of siblings in family-centered intervention.
  • Learners will learn how to set consistent limits using empathy and learn how to offer choices and monitor control throughout the day to decrease power struggles.
Concurrent Session: PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS DURING EARLY LITERACY DEVELOPMENT

Debbie Schrader
USC Caruso Family Center

Monday, July 1 / 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Phonological Awareness during Early Literacy Development

This session reviews research on phonological awareness, developmental hierarchies for phonological awareness pertinent to English and Spanish speakers and evidence-based strategies to develop phonemic awareness in children who are deaf and hard of hearing. Instructional activities that support phonemic awareness and best practices in planning intervention will be highlighted.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to identify the ages and stages of phonological awareness acquisition.
  • Learners will be able to state the importance of phonological awareness training for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Learners will sequence developmental phonemic awareness skills and list two to three evidence-based strategies to support acquisition of phonemic awareness skills.

11:35 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.

Concurrent Session: CHOOSING BOOKS TO SUPPORT ORAL LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

Debbie Schrader
USC Caruso Family Center

Monday, July 1 / 11:35 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.

Choosing Books to Support Oral Language Development

This session will cover a framework for selecting developmentally appropriate books, scaffolds that support novel word and content acquisition, support strategies for expanding word usage during shared reading experiences, and the identification of opportunities for developing word mastery during story retell experiences.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will list three criteria for book selection that supports vocabulary development and domain-specific knowledge for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Learners will identify three evidence-based strategies to promote talk, thought, and interaction during shared storybook reading and articulate opportunities for application when working with parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Learners will state the value of selecting mentor texts when working with children who are deaf or hard of hearing during the period of emergent literacy.
  • Learners will learn about possible early intervention strategies for improving phonological processing skills in children with cochlear implants.
  • Learners will be able to use enforceable statements to decrease repetitions, power struggles, and gain control in daily situations.

11:35 a.m. – 12:40 p.m.

Concurrent Session: MANAGING BILINGUAL PATIENTS ACROSS THE WORLD

Chrisanda Sanchez
University of Miami Ear Institute

Monday, July 1 / 11:35 a.m. – 12:40 p.m.

Managing Bilingual Patients Across the World

As the world continues to become more culturally diverse and mutli-lingual, there is a growing need for clinicians to utilize tools to better serve these patients and their families. This presentation will be focused on discussion of methods for serving non-English speaking pediatric patients, through which the presenter, who is affiliated with the University of Miami Children’s Hearing Program, where services are provided to a diverse patient population including those from outside the US who are non-English speaker. Cultural considerations in these family dynamics and unique barriers that are implicit when serving families from other cultures will be highlighted. Clinical case examples will be reviewed to showcase how pediatric audiologists can modify available diagnostic protocols to better assess these children.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

Learners will review the prevalence of language diversity across the world and how this trend affects pediatric clinical practice.

Concurrent Session: RESOURCING FAMILIES WHO MAY BE UNDER-RESOURCED: HOW DO WE REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE EARLY YEARS?

L. Allen and F. Clarke
Auditory Verbal Lounge, UK

Monday, July 1 / 11:35 a.m. – 12:40 p.m.

Resourcing Families who May be Under-Resourced: How Do We Really Make a Difference in the Early Years?

Research shows a strong relationship between socio-economic status and the way parents think, learn, feel towards and talk with their children. This session will focus on how to help parents adapt their own behaviors to facilitate language growth, executive function and imagination in their child through use of household objects in play and daily routines.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to discuss ways professionals behave to support families to feel competent.
  • Learners will develop a repertoire of simple play routines with common household objects that can help a child develop language, executive function and imaginative thought.
Concurrent Session: LITTLE EARS, TWO LANGUAGES, LET’S TALK!

B. Zapata, J. Bravo, M. Flores
Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children

Monday, July 1 / 11:35 a.m. – 12:40 p.m.

Little Ears, Two Languages, Let’s Talk!

The number of children who are deaf or hard of hearing and linguistically and culturally diverse is rising. Professionals face challenges meeting the needs of these students and their families. This presentation explores early childhood services provided for bilingual/Spanish speaking children in a collaborative environment promoting listening and spoken language.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will identify the stages of language acquisition in bilingual children.
  • Learners will gain techniques to integrate listening and spoken language (LSL) strategies into an early childhood language curriculum within a bilingual setting for children who are deaf/hard of hearing.
  • Learners will review culturally/linguistically appropriate assessments and evaluation data used in a collaborative team approach in a listening and spoken language program.

12:10 p.m. – 12:40 p.m.

Concurrent Session: AUDITORY VERBAL THERAPY AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT

Wendy Arnott
Hear and Say

Monday, July 1 / 12:10 p.m. – 12:40 p.m.

Auditory Verbal Therapy and Literacy Development

This research uses behavioral and neurophysiological methodologies to compare the early reading and spelling abilities and underlying semantic and phonological processing skills of children with cochlear implants (CIs) (6-9 years old) who received early auditory verbal therapy with chronological and mental age matched control children with typical hearing.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to describe the impact of impaired phonological processing on reading and spelling development in children with cochlear implants.
  • Learners will be able to describe how phonological processing can differentially affect reading over time.
  • Learners will be able to discuss possible early intervention strategies for improving phonological processing skills in children with cochlear implants.

12:45 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.

Concurrent Session: BEYOND TRANSLATION: LSL INTERVENTION FOR SPANISH-SPEAKING FAMILIES

Sarah Radlinski
Auditory-Verbal Center, Inc.

Monday, July 1 / 12:45 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.

Beyond Translation: LSL Intervention for Spanish-speaking Families

This concurrent session is designed to assist LSL professionals in providing impactful intervention to children from Spanish-speaking families. Participants will learn how to adjust goals, activities, and tools to be culturally and linguistically relevant for families, while building the sensitivity needed to navigate discussions surrounding cultural differences.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

Learners will list reasons why it is critical to provide intervention that is culturally and linguistically relevant for Spanish-speaking families of children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

Concurrent Session: RESILIENCE: BREAKTHROUGH IMPACTS ON BRAIN ARCHITECTURE

Sherri Fickenscher
Clarke Schools for Hearing & Speech

Monday, July 1 / 12:45 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.

Resilience: Breakthrough Impacts on Brain Architecture

Resilience is described as an adaptive response to serious hardship. Resilience can be developed and shaped throughout a person’s lifetime, but as with all things brain related, what happens early on is what matters most.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

Learners will define resilience as it relates to brain architecture.

Concurrent Session: SOCIAL SKILLS: INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION

J. Alberg, I. Cejas, E. Rushbrooke, C. Rieffe and F. Clark
Yale Alberg & Associates

Monday, July 1 / 12:45 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.

Social Skills: International Perspectives on Assessment and Intervention

This international panel will address the critical role of social instruction for children who are deaf or hard of hearing, the importance of integrating social instruction with language and auditory skill development, and how audiologists, speech pathologists, teachers, and parents can incorporate social skill instruction into daily routines.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to describe the critical importance of social-emotional skill development for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Learners will be able to list three social skills assessments for measuring skill acquisition and application.
  • Learners will be able to list the variables associated with social skills.
Concurrent Session: LITERACY IN IBEROAMERICA: STATUS AND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

L. Flores-Beltran, J. Madell, F. Hinojosa and B. Campero
Cochlear Latin America

Monday, July 1 / 12:45 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.

Literacy in Iberoamerica: Status and Intervention Strategies

The results of literacy functioning level of a study carried out on children with cochlear implants, their families and their teachers in a dozen Ibero-American countries, demonstrates a need for professionals working with the implanted population to have specific evaluation tools and to be able to design appropriate individualized plans.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will understand the literacy performance of children with cochlear implants in Ibero-America compared to their hearing peers.
  • Learners will evaluate and determine the literacy functioning level and skills of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Learners will create a remediation plan for children who are deaf or hard of hearing who are not functioning at age literacy level.

4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Concurrent Session: YOUHEAR, YOUTALK, YOUTUBE

F. Clark and L. Allen
Auditory Verbal UK

Monday, July 1 / 4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

YouHear, YouTalk, YouTube

Video is changing the way adults seek information. Parents want information from a trusted source on what they want, when they want it. Join us to discover “YouHear YouTalk,” which is our YouTube channel, and to learn about our research and resources, where you will leave with new ideas to share with the families your support.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will compare traditional adult learning to the power of video through research regarding adult learning and interactive discussion regarding what parents want.
  • Learners will list four reasons parents would benefit from an online video learning community, such as “YouHear, YouTalk.”
  • Learners will describe a video clip that you could produce with learning outcomes for parents.
Concurrent Session: PREOPERATIVE COMMUNICATION PROFILE FOR PAEDIATRIC CI CANDIDATES

J. Bester
Carel du Toit Centre
B. Kellett
Tygerberg Hospital Stellenbosch University Cochlear Implant Unit

Monday, July 1 / 4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Preoperative Communication Profile for Pediatric CI candidates

A presentation on the development and use of a profile to aid clinicians when selecting cochlear implant candidates within a limited resourced context. This profile may also serve to identify children in need of additional support and can therefore be used in all contexts to guide conversations concerning outcomes from the very beginning. Examples will be discussed to highlight the practical application of this profile when selecting cochlear implant candidates and counseling families. Preliminary data will also be discussed highlighting the significance of pre-implant factors on later outcomes.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to discuss how to use a profile to assist with selection of candidates in limited resource environments.
  • Learners will be able to discuss implications of preoperative concerns on later outcomes.
  • Learners will be able to discuss how to use the profile to guide conversations with all families from the beginning.
Concurrent Session: MEASURING OUTCOMES FOR PEOPLE WITH ADDITIONAL NEEDS

Jessica Balfour-Ogilvy
Hear and Say

Monday, July 1 / 4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Measuring Outcomes for People with Additional Needs

This presentation will outline three functional outcome measures suitable for measuring the Listening and Spoken Language treatment progress and outcomes of people with hearing loss who have additional needs. The strengths, limitations, and the utility of each measure will be explored using case-based demonstrations.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to describe three outcome measures for evaluating change during intervention for people with hearing loss and coexisting additional needs.
  • Learners will be able to explain the purpose of each outcome measure, using case studies.
  • Learners will be able to identify future directions in using these outcome measures in a Listening and Spoken Language Program.
Concurrent Session: PARENTS NEED TO DRIVE THEIR BUS

Pamela Talbot and M. Maggio De Maggi
AudioVerbal

Monday, July 1 / 4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Parents Need to Drive Their Bus

This lecture will present information to parents and therapists who work with them about the importance of parents taking on the main role as facilitators of their children’s auditory learning. Practical strategies will be presented to support families in the beginning of their auditory verbal journey. The differences between traditional speech therapy and Verbal Auditory Therapy will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will assess the importance of parents as facilitators of their child’s learning.
  • Learners will gain practical strategies for supporting families at the beginning of their auditory-verbal journey.
  • Learners will differentiate between traditional speech therapy practices and auditory verbal therapy.

5:05 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.

Concurrent Session: MAXIMIZE THE F-2: STRENGTH BASED COACHING CONCEPTS

Ashley Garber
LSL Learning Partners, LLC

Monday, July 1 / 5:05 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.

Maximize the F-2: Strength Based Coaching Concepts

The AG Bell Academy’s F-2 Self Reflection Form for the LSLS Certification application is a blank page. This presentation will introduce the idea that providing guidance for a mentee about how to assess their performance using tenants of Strength-Based Coaching leads to more productive self-reflection and sets the stage for meaningful coaching conversations.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

Learners will compare examples of mentee reflections before and after use of strength-based coaching approaches.

Concurrent Session: FACTORS INFLUENCING SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT OF CI CHILDREN

Malgorzata Zgoda
The Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing

Monday, July 1 / 5:05 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.

Factors influencing school achievement of CI children

This session will focus on the unique ability of children with cochlear implants to receive environmental sounds and speech sounds and the ability to acquire hearing and communication skills even to the level presented by their hearing peers. Related factors and variation among patients (e.g., biological, physiological and psychological) influence outcomes with the same device which can vary among the patients. The presenter will also share data and experiences from the Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing its pediatric cochlear implant program dating back to 1992.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to describe the school attainments of cochlear implant children at the end of primary education in comparison with those obtained by hearing peers.
  • Learners will be able to describe the effect of the age at cochlear implantation at the school attainments of children with prelingual hearing loss.
  • Learners will be able to describe the impact of parental education level (mothers and fathers) and SES on academic achievements of experienced CI children.
Concurrent Session: TAKING ONE COMPLEXITY OUT OF COMPLEX NEEDS

Sarah Hogan
Auditory Verbal UK

Monday, July 1 / 5:05 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.

Taking one Complexity out of Complex Needs

Children with additional and complex needs are often excluded from research studies on listening and spoken language outcomes. Explore new research from the United Kingdom and learn how a new classification criteria, SNOMED-CT, has been adopted. Explore parental views of the parent-practitioner partnership where their children are facing multiple challenges.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to discuss possible spoken language outcomes for children with additional needs.
  • Learners will be able to adopt the use of SNOMED-CT for the categorization of additional needs.
Concurrent Session: THE FAMILY NEEDS SURVEY IN AVT PRACTICE

Pedro Brás da Silva
Lusiadas Porto Hospital

Monday, July 1 / 5:05 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.

The Family Needs Survey in AVT practice

Auditory-Verbal Therapy (AVT) is an early intervention program focused in supporting, guiding, and coaching parents of children who are deaf and hard of hearing. After parents are given a hearing loss diagnosis for their child, they start a long journey of receiving and dealing with a lot of information. During this period, their needs can be overwhelming. The adapted version of the Family Needs Survey can provide valid, helpful information for the practitioners and a deeper knowledge of each family’s needs to establish a successful and collaborative relationship and to plan and schedule activities in a tailored way.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will reflect on the most appropriate means for each family to obtain the information they need.
  • Learners will identify the best strategies to facilitate the information that the family places as a priority.
  • Learners will understand how the information obtained can enhance the planning and adaptation of the carryover activities suggested in each family’s daily routines.

5:15 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Concurrent Session: TELEINTERVENTION: COACHING FROM THE SIDELINES

Ana Sei and A. Grant
Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children

Monday, July 1 / 5:15 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Teleintervention: Coaching from the Sidelines

How comfortable are you with the use of teleintervention in your practice? Teleintervention promotes the principles of a LSLS approach, as early intervention specialists are virtually required to coach from a distance. This session will focus on the use of effective strategies before, during and after a teleintervention session to encourage parents to take the lead and become their child’s primary listening and spoken language facilitator. You will walk away with ideas and examples of how to incorporate teleintervention into your practice that maximizes parent-child engagement.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will identify ways to guide parents in selecting appropriate activities to incorporate goals before a session.
  • Learners will learn how to keep the parent focused on the objectives during the session to increase parent-child engagement by reducing distractions and problem solving situations.
  • Learners will reflect with the parent at the end of the session on their takeaways and offer carryover ideas.
Concurrent Session: NEVER SAY NEVER: CI AND CN DEFICIENCY

Emma Rushbrooke and J. Bergman
Hear and Say

Monday, July 1 / 5:15 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Never Say Never: CI and CN deficiency

Cochlear nerve deficiency is not uncommon as a cause of profound sensorineural hearing loss in children. Management recommendations can vary for children in this demographic, which can be challenging. This presentation will discuss the option of cochlear implant focusing on pre- and post-assessment and habilitation, which will be demonstrated by a case study.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will discuss the literature related to Cochlear Nerve Deficiency (CND) and cochlear implantation.
  • Learners will describe the assessment process and candidacy considerations.
  • Learners will apply knowledge gained about assessment, cochlear implant candidacy and management of CND to their everyday practice when working with clients with this condition.
Concurrent Session: LIVING LSL WITH ADDITIONAL HEALTH IMPAIRMENTS

Donna Kramer and L. López
Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children

Monday, July 1 / 5:15 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Living LSL with Additional Health Impairments

Thirty to 40 percent of children with hearing loss present additional health impairments. The LSL professional must implement new or adapted strategies for coaching parents, assessing development and evaluating hearing. This session will present audiological accommodations/modifications for testing protocols. Therapy strategies will be presented for working with children with hearing loss and multiple disabilities.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to understand audiological accommodations/modifications that can make the testing protocol more successful.
  • Learners will gain understanding of how to maintain LSLS principles while adapting therapy to meet the needs of children who are deaf and hard of hearing and other health issues.
  • Learners will explore coaching strategies and therapy ideas when working with children with multiple disabilities in addition to hearing loss and their families.
Concurrent Session: FAMILY SUPPORT: 'NICE' IS NOT ENOUGH!

P. Martin and J. Sexton
AR Children’s Hospital

Monday, July 1 / 5:15 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Family Support: “Nice” is not Enough!

Authentic support for families of children who are deaf and hard of hearing is more than “nice.” Using a format that is interactive and engaging, participants will be challenged to coalesce across disciplines and service delivery models to delve in to opportunities that assist families to successfully integrate hearing differences into their lives.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will describe a multi-dimensional framework for family support.
  • Learners will identify formal and informal resources and strategies to connect families.
  • Learners will examine some of the challenges faced by families of children with hearing differences.

Concurrent Sessions: Tuesday, July 2

3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Concurrent Session: CUED SPEECH FOR BABIES WITH AUDITORY NEUROPATHY

Polly Earl
National Cued Speech Association

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Cued Speech for Babies with Auditory Neuropathy

This paper presents the first qualitative study of an infant being cued to simultaneously in Spanish and Dutch by her parents. Results after eight months of exposure to two cued languages revealed the child could visually process each language without any auditory signal.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to define Cued Speech as an effective communication system to use with children who are deaf and hard of hearing.
  • Learners will be able to describe how cued languages can be used simultaneously with deaf children in multilingual homes.
  • Learners will be able to explain how Cued Speech can clarify the speech signal for children and adults with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder.
Concurrent Session: HOME AND AWAY: TELETHERAPY FOR TOTS TO TEENAGERS

Jayne Simpson Allen
The Hearing House

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Home and Away: Teletherapy for Tots to Teenagers

This presentation will present the model of telepractice used with children of various ages at home or school in New Zealand’s north island. The presenter will discuss selection and use of Apps, as well as the logistics of parent coaching, teacher guidance, LSLS AV Therapy for younger children, and linking goals to the curriculum for older children.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to use telepractice to connect with young children and school students who have hearing loss.
  • Learners will be able to plan LSLS sessions for the tele-therapy medium.
  • Learners will learn how to overcome the barrier of distance in providing regular quality LSLS sessions.
Concurrent Session: FAMILY EDUCATION DURING THE SCHOOL YEARS

R. Lucero, A. Guitron, J. Mascolo, and M. Berta
Echo Center/Echo Horizon School

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Family Education During the School Years

Engage in a roundtable discussion of current research that supports best practices in family education programs from early intervention extending through the school year. We will exxplore ideas about how you might be able to implement evidence-informed ideas into new or existing family education programs at your school/clinic.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will review research that supports family education beyond early intervention.
  • Learners will discuss a model of family education program in an elementary school program.
  • Learners will engage in discussion to brainstorm idea for how a family education program could be incorporated into your school site/clinic.
Concurrent Session: SERVICE COORDINATION: COLLABORATIVE FAMILY-CENTRED PRACTICE

M. Melo
Infant Hearing Program, Toronto Public Health
V. Low
Early Abilities, Toronto Public Health
G. Lalonde
Adventure Place, Early Abilities

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Service Coordination: Collaborative Family-Centered Practice

The Toronto Infant Hearing Program (TIHP) developed an initiative to ensure effective family-centered care, collaborative practice and health equity. The Coordinated Family Services Plan (CFSP) achieves improved quality of services, effective mentoring, coaching and family support. This presentation demonstrates how the CFSP facilitates the transition from family-focused to family-centered services.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to describe an effective family-centered approach to service coordination.
  • Learners will be able to identify how a Coordinated Family Services Plan offers equitable services to families.
  • Learners will be able to apply a family-centered philosophy and collaborative practice to service coordination.

3:35 p.m. – 4:05 p.m.

Concurrent Session: MINIMAL HEARING LOSS IN CHILDREN: AUDITORY-VERBAL INTERVENTION

Yu-Chen Hung
Children’s Hearing Foundation

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:35 p.m. – 4:05 p.m.

Minimal Hearing Loss in Children: Auditory-Verbal Intervention

In the beginning of this session, a brief overview of previous studies on minimal hearing loss (MHL) will be provided, especially how it affects children’s overall performance. Subsequently, we will share practical insights and information of our service tailored for this population. To justify this specific intervention protocol, results from a new study of auditory, speech, language and communication performance in children with MHL enrolled in an auditory-verbal program will be present.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to recognize the impact of MHL on a child’s development.
  • Learners will be able to describe the specifications of an aural rehabilitation session for a child with MHL.
  • Learners will be able to discuss the importance of intervention for children with MHL.
Concurrent Session: CULTIVATING THE USE OF TELEPRACTICE

Arlene Stredler-Brown
University of Colorado

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:35 p.m. – 4:05 p.m.

Cultivating the Use of Telepractice

Telepractice is a recognized platform to deliver family-centered early intervention. Obstacles that affect the use of telepractice will be explored along with a review of recent literature supporting telepractice as an effective, satisfactory, and cost-effective option. Successful initiatives to implement telepractice worldwide will be described.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to overcome barriers that limit the telepractice implementation.
  • Learners will be able to share the evidence that provider behaviors and child outcomes follow best practices when services are delivered via telepractice.
  • Learners will be able to utilize strategies to conduct an effective telepractice session.
Concurrent Session: PROMOTING SUCCESS IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION SETTINGS

S. Lenihan and D. Salvucci
Fontbonne University

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:35 p.m. – 4:05 p.m.

Promoting Success in Inclusive Education Settings

This interactive session will address the ways Listening and Spoken Language professionals can facilitate students’ success in inclusive education settings, the competencies needed by professionals in this role and to present a number of model programs for inclusive settings from around the world.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will identify ways professionals can support academic success for children who are deaf and hard-of-hearing in inclusive, general education settings.
  • Learners will list professional competencies needed by Listening and Spoken Language professionals serving in inclusive settings.
  • Learners will describe model programs in inclusive settings from around the world.
Concurrent Session: PARENT INPUT FOR PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT

J. Alberg, H. Francis, D. King, K. Irby and D. Tucci
Duke Medical Center
Duke Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology
Duke Division of Head and Neck Surgery

Tuesday, July 2 / 3:35 p.m. – 4:05 p.m.

Parent Input for Program Development and Improvement

Ongoing program evaluation is necessary to ensure pediatric cochlear implant programs remain responsive to the needs of parents and children. Cochlear implant programs must seek opportunities to dig deeper to fully understand the experiences of patients and families. Parent Advisory Panels can provide the critical information and guidance essential to program improvement.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

Learners will be able to discuss the benefits of involving parents in strategic planning and program improvement.
Learners will be able to identify benefits of engaging parents who have received services elsewhere in program development and improvement.
Learners will be able to list at least three advantages of using a deliberative democratic approach to program evaluation and improvement.

4:10 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.

Concurrent Session: METHODOLOGY OF REHABILITATION IN ASYMMETRIC AND UNILATERAL DEAFNESS

E. Juan
Hospital Son Llátzer
B. Pérez
Clínica Universitaria de Navarra

Tuesday, July 2 / 4:10 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.

Methodology of Rehabilitation in Asymmetric and Unilateral Deafness

The unilateral and asymmetrical hearing loss, highly prevalent in our society, compromise aspects such as the location of sounds, listening in the ear with lower levels of hearing, reducing levels of discrimination in noise environments. These limitations can be mitigated with cochlear implants, but these devices must be complemented with auditory training, which differs from that provided in cases of bilateral and symmetric hearing loss.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will develop a hearing training program for individuals with asymmetrical and unilateral hearing loss.
  • Learners will understand the technology applied to the treatment of unilateral deafness palliated with a cochlear implant.
  • Learners will understand the different treatment options more appropriate for each hearing device.
Concurrent Session: USE OF SCREENS: IMPACT ON DEAF CHILDREN

C. Zarate and D. de Lezica
Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires

Tuesday, July 2 / 4:10 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.

Use of Screens: Impact on Deaf Children

The significant increase in the use of screens is damaging the communicative exchange. Researchers have marked the impact on the language development of the child with typical development. A child who is deaf needs more verbal exposure and auditory experience. The use of screens could impact more severely on their linguistic development.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will identify the impacts of daily exposure time to the screens and specific disadvantages.
  • Learners will learn strategies to reduce screen time.
  • Learners will assess the importance of linguistic exchange as a determining factor during daily interaction with children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
Concurrent Session: THEORY OF MIND AND THE MIDDLE SCHOOL CHILD

Wendy Visser
OCDSB – Teacher/Private Practice, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Tuesday, July 2 / 4:10 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.

Theory of Mind and the Middle School Child

In this presentation, you will learn about Theory of Mind as it relates to hearing loss and the middle school child, discuss current research and look at the revised ToM scale. Activities and strategies to use in sessions for the development of ToM will be provided.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session:

  • Learners will be able to explain Theory of Mind as it relates to hearing loss.
  • Learners will be able to identify the social and complex language deficits in ToM for the middle school child with hearing loss.
  • Learners will be able to take away three strategies/activities to develop ToM in the middle school child with hearing loss.
Concurrent Session: BUILDING SUSTAINABLE LSL-TRAINING PROGRAMS IN EMERGING CONTEXTS

B. Kellet
Tygerberg Hospital University of Stellenbosch Cochlear Implant Unit
J. Bester

Carel du Toit Centre

Tuesday, July 2 / 4:10 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.

Building sustainable LSL-training programs in emerging contexts

This presentation will focus on the journey of Listening and Spoken Language in South Africa with the establishment of a short course for professionals called Listening and Spoken Language South Africa: Professional Training. The short course has been presented four times since 2012. It has been extended to include unique aspects in low-resourced, emerging contexts. The training program and the changes made will be discussed with suggestions for implementation in other contexts. Results of a survey from all participants will be included. Lessons learned will be highlighted for application to other LSL training programs in similar contexts across the globe.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session: Learners will be able to discuss the importance of partnering with international expertise to support sustainability of Listening and Spoken Language training programs.
By the end of this session: Learners will be able to discuss the process of building capacity within emerging contexts for sustainable Listening and Spoken Language training programs, using South Africa as an example.
By the end of this session: Learners will be able to discuss the importance of striving for best practice within emerging contexts.

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