Pre-Symposium Workshops: Sunday, June 30

10:00 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

Pre-Symposium Workshop: FORMING PARTNERSHIPS THROUGH FAMILY-CENTERED LSL STRATEGIES

Cathleen Mathes, Bridgette Klaus
John Tracy Clinic, Los Angeles, California

Sunday, June 30 / 10:00 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

Forming Partnerships Through Family-Centered LSL Strategies

Interested in learning Listening and Spoken Language Strategies and creating true parent partnerships? This workshop will describe John Tracy Clinic’s (JTC) family-centered services locally and globally to young children with hearing loss and how those services offer families hope, guidance and encouragement, ultimately empowering parents as partners. The role of parents as their child’s primary language facilitator will be discussed and demonstrated and Learners will understand how to work with parents in exploration, application and the learning of new skills to help their child achieve age-appropriate communication outcomes and be ready for school with hearing peers. Presenters will discuss JTC’s intensive learning programs that explore childhood hearing loss, LSL auditory-verbal techniques, coaching strategies, language development, emotional support, parent to parent connections and educational services. Video analysis of LSL Cert. AVT sessions, coaching strategies as well as parent interviews will allow Learners to develop their own empowering LSL Cert. AVT sessions and create entrusting connections with families they work with. In addition to a variety of LSL Cert. AVT and coaching strategies, Learners will learn the benefit of parent connection. Workshop Learners will share their own successes and challenges in implementing family centered sessions and programs. Discussions of challenges and ideas to problem solve will allow Learners to share, analyze and develop a plan to equip families with the necessary knowledge and training to help their children achieve their full communication potentials. Ultimately, learners will create an action plan that may help form long lasting parent partnerships.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will analyze video segments of family-centered Listening and Spoken Language Auditory Verbal Therapy sessions and identify Listening and Spoken Language techniques and parent coaching strategies.
  • Learners will listen to video segments of parent interviews that highlight parents’ perspectives in creating true partnerships with professionals and connections with other families to determine ways to implement into their programs and/or practice.
  • Learners will be able to describe challenges in their own practice and create an action plan to implement strategies that form partnerships and connections that empower families.
Pre-Symposium Workshop: MENTORING: HOW TO BUILD POSITIVE MENTOR/MENTEE RELATIONSHIPS

Lyndsey Allen
Independent, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, UK
Elizabeth Tyszkiewicz
Independent, Birmingham, UK

Sunday, June 30 / 10:00 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

Mentoring: How to Build Positive Mentor/Mentee Relationships

Ask about people’s experience of LSLS mentoring and most of them use words like ‘supportive’ and ‘enabling.’ The mentee/mentor relationship is a vital one for growing clinical skills but also confidence, as we are more likely to succeed when we believe we can. Not everyone’s experience of mentoring is this positive. And when it’s not, the impact can be great, and the effects long lasting. The demand for mentors can mean this additional role is sometimes taken on early in the mentor’s career, so both the mentor and mentee are still “learning on the job.” How do we build rewarding, constructive, mutually satisfying mentor/mentee relationships and get the most for all? This workshop is for mentors, mentees and potential mentors and mentees as we explore together the needs of adult learners, personal styles and preferences, giving and receiving constructive, practical feedback, customizing mentor arrangements, language used in feedback sessions, tracking of change, negotiating terms of engagement, finding support, challenges for mentors and mentees, and other components of mentoring. This workshop will include demonstration, problem-solving, discussion, targeted observation, personal reflection, and hopefully some laughter as we work towards a positive experience for all!.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will learn to describe five key ingredients to build constructive and mutually satisfying mentor/mentee relationships.
  • Learners will learn to contrast different ways to provide performance feedback.
  • Learners will learn to formulate ideas to support Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) mentees and mentors.
Pre-Symposium Workshop: LEARNING TO LISTEN SOUNDS: THE ART AND THE SCIENCE

Ashley Garber
LSL Learning Partners, LLC, Ann Arbor, MI
Shelley Chesney

Chesney Center Therapies, LLC. Baton Rouge, LA

Sunday, June 30 / 10:00 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

Learning to Listen Sounds: The Art and The Science

Learning to Listen Sounds are a cornerstone of the Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) approach for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Initially conceptualized by Warren Estabrooks and Lois Birkenshaw-Fleming (1994), these onomatopoeic sound/toy pairs are a developmentally appropriate way to begin auditory practice and language development for beginning listeners. Taking the typical early sound/word associations that many English-speaking families use with very young children (e.g., “moo” with a cow, “beep beep” with a car) and adding the suprasegmental features that are accessible to children with even limited benefit from hearing aids within the context of play and interaction, these sounds become the foundation for early vocabulary and speech development. For aspiring learners in the specialization of Listening and Spoken Language, Learning to Listen Sounds are a natural first-stop resource. However, the depth of science behind their use often goes unexplored. This workshop will review auditory skill development as well as the acoustic properties of speech sounds and related science as applied to the Learning to Listen Sounds. Opportunities for creating modified lists that reflect the language and cultural needs of own caseloads as well as sharing of new ideas for using the Learning to Listening Sounds in higher level auditory skill development will be provided as Learners engage in practical discussions of the use of the Learning to Listen Sounds in family centered therapy/early intervention environments. Sample activities will be analyzed and evaluated as to their relevance to specific aspects of auditory skill development. This workshop will also employ a worksheet as part of an interactive lecture.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will recognize the features of Learning to Listen Sounds as they apply to the auditory skills hierarchy.
  • Learners will evaluate and select Learning to Listen Sound activities for various levels of auditory skill development
  • Learners will create therapy plans that target the transition to next-step goals through integration of speech, language, auditory, and cognitive skills.
Pre-Symposium Workshop: ASSESSING AND TREATING SPOKEN LANGUAGE AND LISTENING DEFICITS FROM COCHLEA TO CORTEX

Jeanane Ferre
Private Practice, Oak Park, IL

Sunday, June 30 / 10:00 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

Assessing and Treating Spoken Language and Listening Deficits from Cochlea to Cortex

Our ability to use spoken language requires the complex interaction of a myriad of acoustic, phonological, linguistic, and cognitive processes – all sub-served by the peripheral and central nervous systems. This process begins at the outer ear and is complete when one executes a response. A deficiency in any of these processes may result in a diagnosis of a hearing loss, auditory processing disorder, central auditory processing disorder, language processing disorder, phonological processing disorder, or other type of deficit. It is important for professionals who work with individuals in the areas of speech, language, hearing, and learning to understand the nature and interaction of the skills involved, the impact of a deficiency in one or more skill sets, how (and who) best to assess these skills, and the kinds of intervention strategies available and appropriate for use with listeners, especially school-age children. By understanding the underlying sensory and neural mechanisms, assessment procedures can be developed and used reliably to evaluate the integrity of processing skills in listeners as young as age four. Differential assessment data can be used to develop functional and effective intervention plans that can minimize a deficit’s adverse effect on the listener’s life, reduce or resolve the deficit itself, and promote skill development among young listeners. In addition to providing information regarding assessment, the workshop presenter will discuss appropriate remediation strategies and tools for children with various auditory disorders. In addition to a lecture format, this workshop will include opportunities for audience interaction, demonstration, and Question and Answer opportunities.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will describe the continuum of skills (peripheral and central) needed for processing spoken language and the impact of any deficiency in skills on a listener’s life.
  • Learners will learn to describe age- appropriate assessment techniques to probe the integrity of various listening skills among listeners with normal hearing or with significant peripheral hearing loss.
  • Learners will learn to effectively implement intervention (management and remediation) for use with listeners with normal hearing or significant peripheral hearing loss that can minimize impact and reduce or resolve deficits.

2:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Pre-Symposium Workshop: PUSHING PAST PLATEAUS

Sylvia Rotfleisch
Hear to Talk, Los Angeles, California

Sunday, June 30 / 2:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Pushing Past Plateaus

Research has shown that when children receive appropriate hearing technology at a young age, they benefit and progress in the development of listening and spoken language. When there are no other issues or additional concerns, it is expected that a child with hearing loss will benefit from the access provided through hearing technology and early intervention. It is often observed and expected that progress, initially, can occur at a rate of more than one year’s progress in one year of time. This trajectory allows children to develop the appropriate abilities and narrow or bridge the gap between their hearing age and their chronological age, as well as “catch up” to typically-developing peers. However, clinicians and parents report that for some children, although everything seems in place for such development, some do not seem to make the expected growth, experience a plateau or regression. Clinicians and parents must aggressively monitor progress with available assessments tools and should not expect or accept a plateau or regression. This workshop will examine possible red flags in auditory, speech and language development that might provide diagnostic information about specific areas to be addressed to prevent or address a plateau. The acoustic components of these red flags issues will be analyzed. Multiple techniques and strategies to help “jump start” the child’s progress will be presented. Learners will discuss and practice more than ten practical strategies that can be implemented in therapy and home such as “The 3-act play,” “The dangling carrot,” and “Silliness Effectiveness.”

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will identify red flags in the development of auditory, speech and language skills.
  • Learners will identify red flags with the associated speech acoustic features.
  • Learners will understand how to implement multiple strategies that help push children past a plateau in their progress when developing listening and spoken language skills.
Pre-Symposium Workshop: FORGET THE PICTURES AND START PLAYING

Noel Kenely, Estelle Gerrett, Louise Ashton
Auditory Verbal UK, London

Sunday, June 30 / 2:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Forget the Pictures and Start Playing

Have you ever been stuck for ideas of how to play in therapy sessions? Have you ever tried keeping a child’s attention for more than two minutes with limited success? Audition and play are at the heart of each Auditory Verbal therapy (AVT) session. In order for AVT to be effective, we need to give the child the best-possible listening experience through the right technology and acoustic environment. Likewise, a child needs the best possible playful experience to learn language. This practical workshop will look at the latest research in the use of guided play and the importance of considering children’s play schema. Attendees will watch examples of guided play in AV sessions with babies and young children including children with additional needs. Learners will be coached in identifying some of the more common play schema and provided with the opportunity to plan for different listening and spoken language goals based on relevant schema. Learners will learn how to extend children’s attention by applying the elements of Process, Problems and Pragmatics. Learners will be invited to try out different resources that can be used for a range of play schema and guided play. This workshop will also include a Question and Answer period related to the observation videotaped specific cases in which playfulness in sessions may not be straightforward.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will be able to discuss the differences between free play and guided play.
  • Learners will be able to identify some of the more common play schema and will feel equipped to plan rehabilitation sessions accordingly.
  • Learners will be able to extend a child’s attention by applying the ‘Three Ps’ principle during purposeful play.
Pre-Symposium Workshop: CONSCIOUS DISCIPLINE: BEHAVIOR STARTS WITH THE BRAIN

Joanna Smith, Jennifer G. Bryngelson, Helen Carter
Hearts for Hearing, Oklahoma City, OK

Sunday, June 30 / 2:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Conscious Discipline: Behavior Starts with the Brain

Integrating the Conscious Discipline approach when working with children who are deaf and hard of hearing creates a culture of safety, connection, and problem-solving. Conscious Discipline is a trauma-informed, brain-based self-regulation program combining discipline, social-emotional learning and school climate into one integrated practice.” The program equips educators to bring these into their own lives first, and then into the lives of their children. When implemented, children engage and meet goals, cooperate in audiology appointments, and succeed in the mainstream classroom, while parents access tools to support Listening and Spoken Language at home. Supporting listening and spoken language is most effective when a child is engaged and cooperative, but when the unexpected happens and problems arise, professionals can feel powerless to educate and achieve great outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Brain research can help guide us in building skills of resilience for children and their families. Hearts for Hearing has adapted the Conscious Discipline approach to focus on listening and spoken language for integration into the therapy room, the audiology office, the classroom, and at home. Presenters of this workshop will explain a neurodevelopmental Brain State Model encouraging attendees to shift our thinking from a traditional discipline model of control to building a culture of learning rooted in safety, connection, and problem solving. This empowers them to spend less time policing behavior and more time teaching vital “life skills.” This workshop comprises a lecture, an interactive discussion, and a small group learning activities, video observations, music, and mnemonic devices.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will identify the three brain states and how they relate to behavior.
  • Learners will identify tools to create an environment of safety, connection, and problem solving.
  • Learners will apply tools of Conscious Discipline into auditory-verbal therapy and audiology, as well as the classroom and home.
Pre-Symposium Workshop: A TO Z – NEWBORN HEARING DIAGNOSTICS (NBD) TO AUDITORY MANAGEMENT THROUGH PRESCHOOL

Sharon Sandridge
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio
Donald Goldberg

College of Wooster/Cleveland Clinic, Wooster/Cleveland, Ohio

Sunday, June 30 / 2:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

A to Z – Newborn Hearing Diagnostics (NBD) to Auditory Management Through Preschool

The implementation of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening has changed the landscape of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Infants can be identified within hours of their birth. Early screening leads to early diagnosis, which in turn should result in early intervention and management of a child’s hearing loss. This workshop will begin with a review of auditory diagnostic hearing tools used to assess hearing sensitivity at birth – not a how-to but a what-is. As audiologists, we should be conducting these tests. As therapists working with the infant who is deaf or hard of hearing, we should be knowledgeable of the tests that are administered and the interpretation of results. Case examples will illustrate the value of such tests. Next, we will address the auditory management of these children describing the “nuts and bolts” of working with children who are deaf or hard of hearing from a therapist’s perspective. We will address an assortment of content areas that are critically important to serving as foundation aspects of practice and also reflect the appropriate knowledge, skills, and abilities to meet our patients’ comprehensive needs. There will be an emphasis on the critical need for excellence in continued audiological assessment, including speech perception measures and methods to facilitate audibility, as it is a critical component in natural Listening and Spoken Language development. This workshop includes active learning and videotape samples that will be used to address the above areas of study. A myriad of resources will also be reviewed and shared with learners.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop:

  • Learners will be able to identify minimal testing for newborn hearing diagnostics.
  • Learners will able to describe advantages to using chirps in assessing thresholds.
  • Learners will be able to identify ABR patterns to suggest Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder.
  • Learners will also describe the critical importance of excellence in audiology as the foundation of auditory-based intervention services for children who are hearing impaired and will discuss the basic model of the levels of auditory functioning — detection, discrimination, recognition, identification, and comprehension (and other “higher” levels of auditory functioning).
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