Sessions

On Demand

Keynote Presentation

EHDI, Developmental Outcomes, and Quality Of Life: What Can We Learn From the First 10 Years of the LOCHI Study?

(Keynote Presentation)

Instructional Level: Advanced

Greg Leigh AO, Ph.D., FACE
Director, NextSense Institute (Australia)

View Session

Concurrent Sessions

LSLS: We Can Change the World! (30-minute session) | Collaborative Case Conversations: Going Deeper (60-minute session)

LSLS: We Can Change the World!

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Jane Madell
Pediatric Audiology Consulting (United States)

Carol Flexer
University of Akron (United States)

Before we actually retire, we (Jane and Carol) want to share our concerns so the next generation can take up the flag. We will discuss what has been accomplished and what still needs to be achieved to obtain listening and spoken language outcomes for today’s children with hearing loss.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe at least three amazing accomplishments that have facilitated listening, spoken language, and literacy outcomes for today’s children with hearing loss.
  • Discuss three main areas of ongoing concern.
  • Explain a variety of ways to address persistent problems that can negatively impact listening and spoken language outcomes.

Collaborative Case Conversations: Going Deeper

Instructional Level: Basic

Teri Ouellette
St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (United States)

Elizabeth Tyszkiewicz
Private Practice (United Kingdom)

Hilda Furmanski
ASARA, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. (Argentina)

Conversations with a more experienced colleague during a work break can be the most professionally valuable thing that happens in a day. We will discuss cases that illustrate challenges and model structured problem-solving processes. Come and join us as we all try to think outside our individual “boxes”.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Use structured joint thinking and discussion in a group setting to move through the process of analysing a case scenario.
  • Identify and articulate areas of challenge and solutions that can lead to developmental progress in a child and family case scenario.
  • Define clear, achievable, and measurable steps towards desired outcomes.
Auditory-Verbal Practice: The Global Conundrum (30-minute session) | A New Frontier: LSLS and Genetics Meet (60-minute session)

Auditory-Verbal Practice: The Global Conundrum

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Shefali Shah
Sound Steps (United Kingdom)

Psychologists and educators advocate for cultural competence and culturally responsive pedagogy. The Need: global relevance of auditory-verbal therapy (AVT) is no longer a Western phenomenon. The Mission: provision of professional, high-quality coaching skills across cultures. The Conundrum: application of AVT globally, especially for families with a different ethos and expectations.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the need for listening and spoken language professionals to demonstrate cultural competence.
  • Indicate which aspects of the therapist-client alliance need to be strengthened.
  • Cite strategies to support and strengthen their therapist-client alliances.

A New Frontier: LSLS and Genetics Meet

Instructional Level: Intermediate

María Fernanda Hinojosa Valencia, Brianda Campero Calderón-Gutiérrez
Aurea Lab, Mexico City (Mexico)

Mary McGinnis, Renee Lucero
John Tracy Center/Mount Saint Mary’s University DHH Graduate Program (United States)

Eliot Shearer
Harvard Medical School (United States)

Amanda Odell
University of Iowa (United States)

Ivette Cejas
University of Miami (United States)

Karla Martinez

Genetic testing raises many questions. The “who, what, when, and why” of genetic testing and genetic counseling will be the topic of a conversation between the audience and a panel of parents and professionals. Audience answers to real-time polls will guide the conversation.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify the broad questions concerning genetics testing and counseling pertaining to children with hearing loss and their families from a global perspective.
  • Describe the current state of genetics testing and counseling pertaining to children with hearing loss and their families from a global perspective.
  • Generate questions and concerns from a variety of perspectives to guide future sessions on genetics testing and counseling in the field of listening and spoken language.
Tips for Your Toolbox Presentations

Resources: Genetic Hearing Loss, Testing, and Studies

Instructional Level: Basic

Paul Sommer
Decibel Therapeutics–a wholly owned subsidiary of Regeneron (United States)

This presentation is designed to empower LSL Specialists and families to access a portal and to learn about genetic hearing loss, benefits of genetic testing for clinicians and families, how to access sponsored, no-cost genetic testing currently for children in U.S. with ANSD, and ongoing gene therapy or natural history studies.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Empower families to learn more about genetic hearing loss and the importance of genetic testing.
  • Help families access sponsored, no-cost genetic testing if and when qualified.
  • Enable families to learn of relevant clinical research opportunities for their children with genetic hearing loss.

Pictographic Stories for Children with Associated Disabilities

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Mary Rosa Cuello
Práctica Privada (Colombia)

The pictographic stories in the collection “Ana’s World” are fun, simple, everyday, and easily adaptable to auditory-verbal practice. Children with disabilities associated with hearing loss could benefit from these types of resources, as could LSL professionals who work with these populations.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain how to use the pictographic stories from the collection “Ana’s World” in auditory-verbal practice with families whose children have disabilities associated with hearing loss.
  • Describe the benefits of using the pictographic stories from the collection “Ana’s World” as a resource for anticipation and conversation with families whose children have disabilities associated with hearing loss.
  • Identify similar pictographic materials and resources that could be adapted to auditory-verbal practice when LSL professionals work with children who are identified late, with limited access to the spectrum, low cognition, difficulties in the development of literacy skills, or other factors associated with hearing loss.

Listening Intervention in Pediatrics With Single-Sided Deafness

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Ashley Irick, Autumn Sanderson, Emily Noss
University of Tennessee Health Science Center (United States)

This session is designed to discuss innovative intervention approaches when treating children with single-sided deafness using a cochlear implant. With the recent expansion of cochlear implant candidacy criteria, speech-language pathologists are increasingly providing intervention for this population. Examples of therapy tools and techniques and clinical outcome trends will be presented.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe single-sided deafness and associated risk factors for speech and language development in children.
  • Identify intervention techniques and tools for use with children with single sided deafness using a cochlear implant.
  • Discuss trends in clinical outcomes.

Tips & Tools: Professional Communication for Teachers

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Amy Nichols
Leander Independent School District (United States)

This four-minute mini presentation will share a digital approach to communicating deaf or hard of hearing student information with both general education and special education teachers.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe strategies and ideas for teacher communication.
  • Access simulations to support understanding of hearing loss and technology.
  • Identify how to read and create an easy-to-use audiogram to support teachers’ understanding.

Using a Planning Guide to Foster Conversations

Instructional Level: Basic

Amanda Schneider
Michigan Department of Education – Low Incidence Outreach (United States)

The Michigan Early Childhood Planning Guide is a tool to facilitate conversations between families and providers around areas of family engagement, language milestones, and access. This guide provides a framework for providers and families to have a shared understanding and support guided discussions.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the benefit of using a planning guide with families.
  • Describe how to use a planning guide as a conversation tool.
  • Identify one tool available to facilitate family conversations.

Enabling Phonological Language Awareness Skills

Instructional Level: Basic

Valeria Beatriz Bosco
Instituto Oral Modelo (Argentina)

The neural bases of reading will be presented. Knowing the brain circuit of reading will allow us to think about the appropriate approach that enables the acquisition of language and literacy skills. Phonological Awareness is a determining cognitive skill, videos will be presented showing specific tasks to stimulate Phonological Awareness.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the neural bases of reading.
  • Explain the importance of the development of Phonological Awareness of language and its predictive value.
  • Differentiate and organize types of tasks so that the child achieves phonological skills during LSL sessions.

Listen Camp: Best Week of the Year!

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Linda Sasser
Florida State University

This presentation explores the vision and benefits of creating a day camp for children with hearing loss. The camp aims to enhance communication skills, build confidence, and foster friendships by providing a supportive environment, specialized activities, and trained staff. Join me in exploring the impact of this exciting event.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of creating a specialized camp for children with hearing loss to provide a supportive and inclusive environment for socialization, learning, and personal growth.
  • Describe the benefits of a camp tailored to the needs of children with hearing loss, including opportunities to develop spoken communication skills, build self-confidence, and foster a sense of belonging and acceptance.
  • Discuss insights into the practical aspects of planning and organizing the camp, including listening, language, and self-advocacy goals.

An Investigation of Deaf Education Preparation Programs

Instructional Level: Advanced

Kelsey Large
St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf/ Indiana University (United States)

This systematic review explored the current deaf education teacher preparation programs in the United States. Data was collected from 76 programs at 48 universities on various program characteristics, such as modality, among others. Current results were compared to past reviews to explore trends and make recommendations for future practice.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the current state of deaf education teacher preparation programs and trends over time and identify current gaps in deaf educator teacher preparation.
  • Explain the implications of the current state of deaf education teacher preparation in the field.
  • Identify and describe possible solutions for improving preservice and in-service training for deaf educators.

Concurrent Sessions

Listening Guiding Management of Moderate-Severe Hearing Loss

Listening Guiding Management of Moderate-Severe Hearing Loss

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Joanna McAdam, Pia Watkins
The Shepherd Centre (Australia)

This session examines timing of cochlear implantation for children with moderate-severe hearing loss, comparing standard language assessments with listening trajectories using the Functional Listening Index – Paediatric (FLI-P). Findings reveal early concerns in listening skills despite average language scores, advocating for FLI-P’s sensitivity. This approach integrates both assessment aids tailored to cochlear implant candidacy, fostering outcomes and personalized rehabilitation.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Discuss the research behind the FLI-P.
  • Explain how to closely monitor functional listening skills and how to enhance listening skill development in children with hearing loss.
  • Interpret common clinical patterns seen in practice and how these can guide clinical management and support planning.
Research to Real Rooms: Applying Best Practice

Research to Real Rooms: Applying Best Practice

Instructional Level: Basic

Kaytie Cook Ward
Westwind School Division Raymond Elementary (Canada)

For children with hearing loss, having access to group settings that focus on whole child development is a crucial component to an intervention’s success. To all leaders and participants in these settings, join us and dive into the “how” of making the most of these crucial developmental times.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Recognize best-practice strategies for whole child development in group settings from the most current research and publications.
  • Review real-life applications of best-practice strategies and examples of peer play and group intervention in early learning programs.
  • Practice reflective questioning and other strategies to determine best practice application moving forward in their own intervention settings.
DHH: Algorithm for Managing Complex Cases

DHH: Algorithm for Managing Complex Cases

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Beauty Hariz
Cochlear Middle East and Africa (United Arab Emirates)

Sabine ElDeek
Al Jalila Children’s Specialty Hospital (United Arab Emirates)

During this presentation, we will demonstrate the pathways of care for children who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) who have additional difficulties. As this population is heterogeneous with significant occurrence within the Arab Region, identification of contributing etiologies and multidisciplinary management is paramount.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Recognize the increased prevalence of DHH children with additional difficulties in the Arab region.
  • Identify pathways for successful management of DHH children with additional difficulties within specific cultural and environmental backgrounds.
  • Define the need for language development in early years, regardless of the communication mode chosen by the families.

Concurrent Sessions

Towards Enhanced Music Perception in CI Users (30-minute session) | Music Appreciation for Children with Hearing Loss (30-minute session)

Towards Enhanced Music Perception in CI Users

Instructional Level: Advanced

Elinor Tzvi-Minker
Syte Institute (Germany)

Discover the latest advancements in speech and music rehabilitation tools for cochlear implant users and understand the scientific concepts behind them! Take part in a live-demo and have the unique opportunity to actively participate in the development of new technologies.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the science behind the effect of singing on music perception abilities in CI users from experimental and neuroscientific perspective.
  • Review new online technologies and platforms for speech and music rehabilitation for CI users.
  • Gain first-hand experience in a newly developed product for people with hearing loss and engage in an open discussion with the developers.

Music Appreciation for Children with Hearing Loss

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Bridgette Klaus
John Tracy Center (United States)

Chrysa Kovach
Neighborhood Music School (United States)

Musical interactions with young children have a profound impact on communication, social emotional well-being, speech, movement, sensory processes, cognition, language, literacy, and auditory development. Through research, music curriculum examples, and video presentations, we will show how to successfully use music within your classroom or therapy sessions.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Consider two new frameworks when planning classroom music activities.
  • Describe their own musicality and the multiple benefits of music for children with hearing loss.
  • Engage in active musical lessons that they can replicate for their own students.
Navigating Aural Diversity in Pediatric Aural Rehabilitation

Navigating Aural Diversity in Pediatric Aural Rehabilitation

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Domitille Lochet
University of Miami (United States)

This presentation highlights cases of diverse auditory profiles (e.g., auditory neuropathy, autism) and proposes strategies like parental coaching and co-treatment to deepen comprehension of aural diversity in aural rehabilitation.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • List one speech and language characteristic of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder.
  • Name one strategy to treat in children with diverse auditory profiles.
  • Identify one bias that pertains to auditory skills/development.
Free to Chat? Power of Professional Discussions!

Free to Chat? Power of Professional Discussions!

Instructional Level: Advanced

Trudy Smith
NextSense Institute (Australia)

Professional discussions allow us to engage and learn with and from each other using shared knowledge, concept knowledge, and subject-specific vocabulary. This presentation will discuss research findings about the benefits of peer discussion on professional identity, and consider the benefits of establishing set and structured discussion times with your peers.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • List the research benefits of peer discussion on professional identity.
  • Identify strategies for promoting safe and engaging discussion spaces.
  • Name the benefits of setting established discussion times with peers.

DHH Conversation

Conversations with Individuals who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing: Three Personal Perspectives

Instructional Level: Basic

Erin Mangwiro, Brendan Vasanth
AG Bell (United States)

Ammanu Dawit
Emory University, Goizueta Business School (United States)

Attend this lunch and learn session to hear about AG Bell’s programming for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and the impact it has made. Hear from real individual experiences shared by our DHH young adults.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the diverse successes of the many individuals who are DHH and who have grown up living the LSL life.
  • Recognize the impacts of AG Bell’s programming for tweens, teens, and young adults on the lives of participating individuals who are DHH.
  • Summarize the value of community support (funding) to AG Bell programs and how that support extends learning opportunities for tweens, teens and young adults who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Concurrent Sessions

Telepractice at Cochlear Colombia: Achievements and Challenges (30-minute session) | “All Right?” The Power of Coordination (30-minute session)

Telepractice at Cochlear Colombia: Achievements and Challenges

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Mary Rosa Cuello
Práctica Privada (Colombia)

Marta Valbuena
Cochlear Colombia (Comoros)

LSL professionals will learn about a real-life experience of a telepractice program implemented nationwide by Cochlear Colombia. We will discuss successes and challenges of the remote intervention of pediatric and adult cochlear implant users and their families in a socially diverse country.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the challenges in implementing a national telepractice program in Colombia and propose some strategies that have improved professional practice.
  • Describe the progress, achievements, and challenges of the telepractice program that is implemented in Cochlear Colombia, benefiting families from different areas of the national territory.
  • Identify common challenges in implementing a nationwide telepractice program in Colombia and propose some solutions.

“All Right?” The Power of Coordination

Instructional Level: Basic

Leire Martín Méndez
Aurea Tav Madrid / Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (Spain)

What happens when we observe that a patient is not going as expected but the audiological information/programming indicates that everything is “going well”? In this session, using two real cases, we will address the importance of functional hearing, speech acoustics, audiological assessments, and the power of coordination.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify and substantiate what information is important to provide and receive as therapists in coordination with audiologists/programmers.
  • Explain the importance of functional listening skills and verbal audiological tests for proper adaptation and correct auditory development.
  • Use different tools to describe observations and generate hypotheses about cases.
Bilingual Success in Middle Eastern CI Children (30-minute session) | Why Early Connections Matter for Communication (30-minute session)

Bilingual Success in Middle Eastern CI Children

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Beauty Hariz
Cochlear Middle East and Africa (United Arab Emirates)

Sabine ElDeek
Al Jalila Children’s Specialty Hospital (United Arab Emirates)

Discover how bilingualism and trilingualism empower children with cochlear implants (CI), enhancing their language skills and cognitive development. Explore practical strategies and inspiring case studies from the Middle East that can help unlock the potential of the children you work with. Join us to pave the way for their remarkable achievements.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify the cognitive benefits of bilingualism in CI children and explain how it positively influences their linguistic development.
  • Apply practical strategies and recommendations for promoting successful bilingualism in CI children, fostering better integration and educational outcomes and learning from the Middle Eastern context.
  • Recognize and address common misconceptions and challenges related to bilingualism in the Middle East for CI children.

Why Early Connections Matter for Communication

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Frances Clark, Amy Spicer
Auditory Verbal UK (United Kingdom)

What do early connections mean regarding communication and relationships? How does deafness impact them? What do parents need to connect with their children, creating secure attachment and communicative foundations? Join us to explore how we can support the needs of children and parents, reflecting on practical examples and latest research.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain how early relationships between parents and their children support communication development.
  • Identify strategies to facilitate connections between parent and child which support the development of communication skills.
  • Reflect on their own practice with parents identifying how they can support them further.
A Uniform Assessment for a Diverse Population

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Uma Soman
Listening Together (United States)

Shahida Mogar
Private Practice (India)

Assessments are crucial to establish a child’s current level of functioning and to plan data-driven interventions. This presentation discusses an assessment protocol evaluating listening, language, and literacy skills of children who are deaf. This protocol can be used and adapted for bilingual or multilingual children and those with additional disabilities.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify at least three assessment tools or techniques that can be used with culturally and linguistically diverse families.
  • Describe why and how assessments can be conducted in partnership with families.
  • Explain how assessments can be used to plan data-driven interventions.

Keynote Presentation

Let’s Play and Talk: Linking Children’s Language and Pretend Play Abilities

Instructional Level: Advanced

Louise Paatsch, Ph.D., MEd, GDipSpecEd (HI), DipTeach(Prim)
Professor, Deakin University (Australia)

View Session

Innovations in Hearing Session

Inspired by a Lifetime of Hearing Performance: How Cochlear Cares for Kids

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Stephanie Noeller, Wendy Potts
Cochlear (United States)

From our implant technology with a history of exceptional reliability to our 9-month candidacy indication, Cochlear has over 40 years of industry-leading innovation in products and services. Join us to learn more about the latest in Cochlear’s technology and how it enables children, their families and professionals to experience care when and where they need it most.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe Cochlear’s pediatric candidacy indications.
  • Recognize Cochlear’s innovative suite of tools and resources that enable recipients and professionals to experience care where and when they need it.
  • Identify Cochlear’s profile of sound processors.
On Demand

Concurrent Sessions

All About LSLS Certification

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Ulrika Löfkvist
Uppsala University (Sweden)

Gayla Guignard
AG Bell Association (United States)

This session will provide an overview of the Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) certification process and related professional issues that impact aspiring LSL Specialists, currently certified professionals, and individuals who are interested in certification. Attendees can expect to be updated on any changes to the certification process that may have occurred in the past year.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Recognize necessary requirements to complete the certification process.
  • Identify the process and schedule for annual renewal of certification.
  • Summarize the benefits of using the LSL Registry to conduct certification and continuing education documentation activities and in building community.
Supporting Children with Late-Onset Hearing Loss in Taiwan: What We Do, and How We Do It

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Ming Lo, Chian-Yow Kwek
Children’s Hearing Foundation (Taiwan)

An approach for handling the difficulty of identifying late-onset hearing loss in preschool children will be presented to the audience. Some children develop hearing loss sometime after birth but before entering school. Identifying these children can be challenging, and an effective and affordable solution is needed to address this issue.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain why it is difficult to identify late-onset hearing loss in preschool-aged children.
  • Describe a list of exogenous and endogenous risk factors for late-onset hearing loss.
  • Determine a checklist of listening performance can help observe potential listening difficulties in children’s everyday context.
Navigating the Journey: Supporting Social Development

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Emma Rushbrooke, Paula Johnson, Tiffany Burch
Hear and Say (Australia)

We will share a framework for the delivery of social skills group programs, focusing on programs designed for older children, teens, and young adults with hearing loss. We will include an overview of supporting research to demonstrate the need and key social frustrations commonly faced by this cohort.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the reasons and need for continued social skill programs for older children, teens, and young adults with hearing loss.
  • Explain the key topic areas covered during Hear and Say group programs to build social skills.
  • Describe generalized findings from Children’s Communication Checklist (CCC-2) and from Social Skills Improvement System (SSiS).

Concurrent Sessions

Creating Effective Partnerships (45-minute session) | Eyes Open, Ears On: Facilitating Wear Time (45-minute session)

Creating Effective Partnerships

Instructional Level: Basic

Carrie Norman
Collaborative Communications (United States)

Join us as we explore the theories that drive effective teaming in a variety of settings. This 90 minute workshop is appropriate for SLPs, TOD/HHs, Gen Ed teachers, SPED teachers, and program administrators working with children with hearing differences in clinical and educational settings.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify the five stages of teaming and how they relate to working with parents and other professionals.
  • Define the three stages of the brain process for engaging parents and other professionals in a new process.
  • Practice the use of powerful questions and explore social perspective taking with parents and other professionals.

Eyes Open, Ears On: Facilitating Wear Time

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Parker Vanegas
Hearts for Hearing (United States)

Research has shown cochlear implant wear time influences the listening and spoken language outcomes children achieve after implantation and that achieving full-time use of hearing technology is challenging in young children. This presentation will describe the key components of the Eyes Open, Ears On program to promote children’s device wear time.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify four components of the Eyes Open, Ears On program.
  • Identify three new strategies for increasing wear time in children with hearing loss.
  • List three conclusions drawn from the Eyes Open, Ears On program thus far.
Disruptive Technologies In LSLS Service Delivery (60-minute session) | Now Hear Me: A Student's Perspective (30-minute session)

Disruptive Technologies In LSLS Service Delivery

Instructional Level: Basic

K. Todd Houston
University of Akron & 3C Digital Media Network (United States)

This presentation explores the impact of disruptive technologies and artificial intelligence (AI) in improving listening and spoken language (LSL) services for children with hearing loss. It highlights innovative solutions that enhance communication and learning outcomes, emphasizing the potential of AI to revolutionize this critical field.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Define the role of disruptive technologies and AI in healthcare and education.
  • Identify practical applications of AI in LSL service delivery.
  • List three benefits of AI in LSL service delivery.

Now Hear Me: A Student’s Perspective

Instructional Level: Advanced

Christy Hiergeist, Naomi Wicentowski
Delaware County Intermediate Unit #25 (United States)

Countless hours are spent with students teaching them how to listen and talk. Now it is our turn to listen to them. A student’s voice should be heard and respected by professionals who write IEP’s and educational plans. Learn techniques to run student-led IEP’s and ensure our students are heard.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the components of a student-led IEP and recognize strategies that can be utilized to help students of all ages and abilities participate in their IEP meetings.
  • Engage parents, students, and IEP teams in meaningful conversations about why a student’s voice is imperative to the IEP process to ensure meaningful progress and growth in all areas of a student’s development.
  • Identify techniques to question students and help them identify their needs and feelings about their hearing loss and hearing technology to advocate for themselves.
Poster + Podium Presentations

Model of Socio-Labor Inclusion in Deaf People

Instructional Level: Basic

María Gutiérrez
Hospital Sótero del Río (Chile)

A large percentage of people with disabilities are disadvantaged and have lower incomes. For this reason, an intervention model was created that supports labor and student insertion, encouraging them to stay in these occupations. This model seeks to fulfill the right of full participation and is an integral development of this population.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the needs of people with hearing loss in the Chilean context for social and labor inclusion.
  • Describe the importance of social and occupational inclusion in the self-perception, autonomous life and social participation of people with hearing loss.
  • Identify the stages and the multidisciplinary team of an intervention model focused on social and labor inclusion.

Expanding the Acoustic Reflex Test Battery

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Lamiaa Abdelrehim, Brian Earl
University of Cincinnati (United States)

This presentation explores the use of narrowband noise in Acoustic Reflex Growth Function (ARGF) measurements, a novel approach in auditory diagnostics for detecting subtle auditory nerve changes. It highlights the potential for enhanced accuracy in hearing assessments and advancements in understanding auditory system disorders.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the Acoustic Reflex Growth Function (ARGF), its role in auditory diagnostics, and its significance in assessing the integrity and functionality of the peripheral auditory system and lower brainstem structures.
  • Explain the differences in the diagnostic capabilities of ARGF measurements when using narrowband noise (NBN) stimuli compared to traditional tonal stimuli, and how these differences may impact clinical assessments of auditory nerve function.
  • Demonstrate how to interpret ARGF measurements, particularly with NBN stimuli, in the context of speech-in-noise perception and auditory system disorders, integrating findings from normative studies and equipment variability.

Cochlear Implant + ASD: A Challenge

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Marina Alietti, Ezequiel Centeno
Instituto Oral Modelo (Argentina)

Participants will be able to identify the challenges of performing a cochlear implant calibration in a child diagnosed with ASD and the importance of obtaining information on behavioral responses to complement them with objective methods. Basic behavioral skills to achieve cooperative responses will be described.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify the challenges of performing cochlear implant calibration in children diagnosed with ASD.
  • Summarize the variety of outcomes for children implanted with ASD in order to counsel their families.
  • Identify prerequisite skills for performing cochlear implant calibration in children diagnosed with ASD.

Ready, Steady, Think! Parent EF program

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Joanna McAdam
The Shepherd Centre (Australia)

Participants will be guided through a four-week program designed for parents of children with hearing loss. The program aims to equip parents with understanding of the relationship between hearing loss and excutive function (EF) skills across the developmental period and to provide practical strategies for parents to coach their children.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Demonstrate EF skills to parents.
  • Explain the relationship between EF and cognitive development to parents.
  • Coach parents in strategies to support their child’s EF skills.

Go Team! Examples of Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Jeanette Smoot, Teena Young, Cindy Larsen
Utah State University (United States)

At Utah State University, speech-language pathology, audiology, and deaf education graduate students engage in interdisciplinary practicums. This poster presentation includes descriptions of weekly team collaboration opportunities, tools for co-planning and child progress monitoring, and feedback from graduate students regarding their intentions to apply this model in future work settings.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Summarize examples of interdiciplinary collaboration in a preschool setting.
  • Describe co-planning and data collection tools.
  • Interpret graduate student feedback and motivation to implement such practices in future professional settings.

MCF: Benefits, Challenges, Insights & More

Instructional Level: Basic

Martina Guarello
IDLA (Chile)

This qualitative research seeks to gain an in-depth understanding of the work of professionals who use PCF in auditory-verbal work with children with hearing loss and deafness, addressing the benefits, challenges, receptivity of families, and knowledge and skills that a professional who uses PCF must manage.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify the benefits and challenges of using PCF in working with infants and children with hearing loss and deafness and their families, from an auditory-oral or auditory-verbal approach.
  • Explain the opinion of professionals regarding the vision and receptivity of families of children with hearing loss and deafness towards PCF.
  • Analyze the knowledge and skills that a professional who uses PCF must handle when working with infants and children with hearing loss and deafness and their families, from an auditory-oral or auditory-verbal approach.

Performance in CI children with Additional Disabilities

Instructional Level: Basic

Shujiro Minami
NHO Tokyo Medical Center (Japan)

Among the children who are deaf and hard of hearing who have a cochlear implant (CI) with multiple disabilities and Grade 0-I malformations, 60% achieved level 8 of R-CAP (understanding conversations with familiar speakers) or higher. In contrast, only 13% of children with Grade II-III malformations reached level 8 of R-CAP or higher.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the effects of CIs on children with additional disabilities.
  • Explain the simple grading system for inner ear malformations.
  • Review the Revised Category of Auditory Performance (R-CAP).

Tracking Your Bilingual CI Children in CDIs

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Maki Yazaki
Hyogo Medical University Hospital (Japan)

We looked into the relationship between the vocabulary size and the grammatical particles in Japanese for 10 children who received cochlear implants (CIs) in the early stage at our hospital. One of the 10 cases is a bilingual child and this poster/presentation will focus on that child.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify the progress of bilingual children with CIs.
  • Describe the relationship between the grammatical particles and vocabulary size in children with CIs.
  • Explore the usefulness of using CDIs for bilingual children with CIs.

ABI, AVT and Objective Speech Perception Outcomes

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Yaffa Citron
AV Israel (Israel)

Auditory Brainstem Implants (ABI) in children has presented opportunities and challenges to families and professionals. This case study describes the progress of a child ABI recipient enrolled in intensive Auditory-Verbal Therapy with a collaborative mapping approach at our AV Israel Center. Longitudinal speech perception testing demonstrates promising speech perception results.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe hearing challenges for those who receive an ABI.
  • Identify candidacy criteria for ABI implantation.
  • Describe the use of objective speech perception test as an ongoing diagnostic tool.

Reducing Delays for Cochlear Implant Candidates

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Christina Bloodworth
Rady Children’s Hospital (United States)

Patients expect us to create systems that allow them transition through the Cochlear Implant (CI) process as quickly as possible to meet the goal of implantation by 6 months of age. This can be difficult to do when scheduling multiple appointments. Our goal was to reduce delays for our families.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • List key members of a multidisciplinary team needed when evaluating candidacy for cochlear implantation.
  • Describe the teach back model and the role it plays in counseling families through the CI candidacy process and beyond.
  • Identify at least 2 benefits of a clinic-based model for CI candidates and their families.

Comorbidity of Hearing Loss and Hypertension

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Brian Earl, Aura Vargas
University of Cincinnati (United States)

Claudia Almazan, Ana Cervantes
University of Anahuac (Mexico)

Dulce Ayala
Fundacion Palace (Mexico)

This presentation will discuss the comorbidity of hearing loss and hypertension among a group of adults living in southern Mexico. The results of the study indicate that the systolic pressure of individuals with hearing loss is significantly higher than individuals with typical hearing.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify the relationship between hearing loss and hypertension.
  • Describe the etiology of auditory pathology related to hypertension.
  • Identify other comorbidities of hearing loss (e.g., diabetes).

Concurrent Sessions

Implications of the Vestibular System in the School

Instructional Level: Basic

Sofia Fernandez Becerra
Instituto Oral Modelo (Argentina)

This session will provide a general knowledge about what Sensory Integration is, and especially the understanding of one of its systems, “the vestibular system,” in the child’s school life. What implications does this system have in the school area and what do we observe in children when they have inadequate vestibular processing?

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe Sensory Integration, mainly vestibular processing, and the importance in the development of children.
  • Identify signs of atypical vestibular sensory development and its effects on participation in school activities.
  • Identify and reflect on the type of games that our children with hearing loss have and how to encourage sensory development.
Coaching and Assessment through Shared Book Reading (30-minute session) | Evolving, Thriving Bookshelves: Choices for All Voices (30-minute session)

Coaching and Assessment through Shared Book Reading

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Neera Lalwani
AURED (India)

Basariya Basheer
Ear Science Centre (India)

Uma Soman
Listening Together (United States)

Join us in the enchanting world of shared book magic! Explore facilitative language techniques for coaching parents, engaging strategies, and assessments to enhance the child’s communication development. Unveil the power of using non-standardized assessments for tracking progress. Join us for an empowering experience, igniting a lifelong journey of learning!

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Demonstrate coaching skills to encourage caregivers in using open-ended questions during shared book reading.
  • Evaluate and measure progress in language development outcomes using non-standardized assessments.
  • Observe and maximize all communication attempts (verbal and preverbal) to facilitate language development during shared book reading.

Evolving, Thriving Bookshelves: Choices for All Voices

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Geeta Shandilya, Kim Lynch
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech (United States)

Professionals and families will reflect on the importance of diversity in children’s literature, examine research and practice concerning representation in children’s books, gain tools and knowledge to analyze literature and diversify their bookshelves, and identify literature featuring children who are deaf or hard of hearing and learning to listen and speak.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Examine research that demonstrates the importance of diversity in children’s books.
  • Analyze their literary selections used in serving children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Identify resources to build a rich literary collection featuring children who are deaf or hard of hearing and learning to listen and speak.
Exploring Role Play for Narrative Language Growth

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Lyndsey Allen
Auditory Verbal UK (United Kingdom)

Stories are important. The ability to sequence events and explain cause and effect requires complex language skills. For many deaf children, understanding and telling narratives is a challenge that affects literacy. Discover how to support children in dramatic role play so they practice these skills and develop their narrative language.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify common elements found in the structure of oral narratives and imaginative role play.
  • Describe imaginative role play activities used in auditory-verbal therapy sessions to support narrative.
  • Formulate a plan for a child you support to develop narrative language skills.

Concurrent Sessions

Coaching Parents through Video-Feedback Sessions in AVT

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Camille Vanin
Maddie Communique (France)

This session will focus on the video-feedback technique, described as one of the most effective in parenting coaching, yet used little clinically. We’ll discuss the benefits of this technique and present the INTERACT’ program, developed by Camille Vanin and Sarah Jullien. The program’s adaptation for auditory-verbal therapy (AVT) will also be discussed.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the benefits of video-feedback in parenting coaching.
  • Discover the INTERACT’ program and its adaptation to listening strategies.
  • Use the video-feedback technique to encourage parents to implement effective strategies during book reading.
Are Our Children Hearing Well Enough?

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Jane Madell
Pediatric Audiology Consulting (United States)

Joan Hewitt
Project Talk (United States)

For children with hearing loss, auditory brain access throughout the frequency range is critical, but we cannot simply assume technology is optimally programmed. Audiologists, LSLS, SLPs, TOD, and parents must assess speech perception in sufficient detail to determine areas needing improvement. We will discuss administration and interpretation of these assessments.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify appropriate tasks to assess speech perception skills.
  • Explain how to assess technology to determine if it is providing sufficient benefit.
  • Distinguish what must change in technology to improve speech perception skills.
Partnering with Families to Achieve Equitable Services (30-minute session) | Loss to Follow Up and Parent Education (30-minute session)

Partnering with Families to Achieve Equitable Services

Instructional Level: Basic

Melissa Stone Mengistu, Jenna Pellicori-Curry, Julie Verhoff, Shanda Brashears
Nemours Children’s Health, Delaware (United States)

Kristin Johnson
Delaware Statewide Programs for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind (United States)

Arielle Morris
NCC/Statewide, Parent Information Center of Delaware (United States)

This presentation will discuss disparities and challenges faced by families of d/Deaf and hard of hearing children in Delaware. Barriers to equitable service delivery will be explored and key state agencies dedicated to supporting them will be discussed. Practical tools to build capacity and address obstacles will be reviewed.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Name one barrier to service delivery for children who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing in your state.
  • List one state agency that can help families of children who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Name one strategy you can add to a family’s toolbox to help reduce barriers to service delivery.

Loss to Follow Up and Parent Education

Instructional Level: Basic

Stormey Cone
Georgia Department of Education, State Schools Division (United States)

Sherri Nighbert
Georgia Department of Education (United States)

In this presentation, we will outline why appointment no show rates, cancellation rates, and loss to follow up rates are elevated; explain how Georgia Mobile Audiology (GMA) has addressed this issue in our state and; how participants can integrate a similar approach where they live.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Explain the relationship between early diagnosis/intervention and language and literacy outcomes.
  • Identify obstacles families face making and going to medical appointments.
  • Describe strategies to decrease diagnostic ABR appointment No Show rates, appointment Cancellation rates, and Loss to Follow Up rates.

Parent/Caregiver Conversation

Conversations with Families: Learning from AG Bell Global Family Council

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Julie Swaim
AG Bell (United States)

Jessica Bucio
(Mexico)

Noriko Toyama, Chisako Demachi
(Japan)

Nayela Ahmad
(India)

Rosary Kwak
(Canada)

Julie Swaim, AG Bell Parent Support Consultant, will moderate a panel of members of the newly formed AG Bell Global Family Council. These parents from around the world will share their experiences to increase professionals’ understanding of family needs and challenges. Professionals will learn ways to support families.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe five parent feelings in the early stages of identification and intervention.
  • Identify three challenges that caregivers describe in accessing services for their children.
  • List three ways to increase feelings of support and wellbeing in parents.

Keynote Presentation

Congenital CMV Infection: The Unknown and Common Cause of Hearing Loss and/or Neurodevelopmental Disorders

(Keynote Presentation)

Instructional Level: Advanced

Ulrika Löfkvist, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVEd
Associate Professor
Uppsala University (Sweden)

Albert Park, MD
University of Utah (United States)

Holly Teagle, AuD
University of Aukland (New Zealand)

Eva Kaltorp, MD, Ph.D.
Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)

Jessica Dunn, MD
University of Calgary (Canada)

View Session

Concurrent Sessions

SSD: Management and Outcomes Post CI

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Emma Rushbrooke, Sharon Bruna, Lynda Farwell
Hear and Say (Australia)

This presentation will provide information on the functional improvements and outcomes in listening ability after cochlear implants (CI) and look at how this is maintained over time. Pre and post-CI assessment data from a cohort of children using CI for Single Sided Deafness (SSD) will be presented as well as listening and spoken language intervention strategies.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of treatment options and be able to describe the pre and post-CI assessment protocol for children with SSD.
  • Identify and explain the benefits of binaural hearing.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the audiological management and listening and spoken language therapy required to optimise outcomes.
Arabic Linguistic Rhythms & Music

Arabic Linguistic Rhythms & Music

Instructional Level: Advanced

Yara Harb
Private practice (Canada)

Ellen A. Rhoades
Global Consultant (United States)

Learning about neural oscillators, i.e., neural synchrony, has changed how we behave regarding children with hearing loss and other developmental differences. Research findings and outcomes from our survey affect cross-cultural intervention strategies, which include assessments and linguistic input. In turn, we focus on developing speech rhythms across the Arab diaspora.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe various indicators or characteristics of parent-child interactional synchrony.
  • Explain the similarities and differences between stress-timed and syllable-timed speech rhythms.
  • Identify music-related issues and strategies unique to the Arab World, collectively brainstorming to arrive at additional strategies.
Trajectories & Traffic-Lights: Infant Auditory-Vocal Progress

Instructional Level: Advanced

Inge Kaltenbrunn
NextSense (Australia)

Candice Gray
Telethon Speech & Hearing (Australia)

Participants will gain insight into how the triangulation of assessment data for infant audition (PEACH), vocal competency (IMP), and vocal behaviour (LENA-AVA) reveals patterns of relationship that substantiate and explain adequate (within norms), borderline, or inadequate (delayed) progress toward speech for infants <12 months; UHL, HAs, or CI.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify and monitor an infant’s auditory-vocal progress toward speech <12 months of age, using triangulation of ‘stage-for-age’ (normed) prelinguistic assessment data (PEACH, IMP, LENA).
  • Interpret underlying features of atypical auditory-vocal development in infants <12 months of age via representative case studies.
  • Describe adjustments needed in service delivery to support developmental needs made visible by triangulation of infant auditory-verbal assessment data.

Keynote Presentation

Fueling Spoken Language Development through Auditory Access

(Keynote Presentation)

Instructional Level: Advanced

Ryan McCreery, Ph.D.
Vice President of Research, Boys Town National Research Hospital (United States)

View Session

Genetics Forum

Opening Presentation

What's Happening and What We Make of It

Instructional Level: Advanced

Howard Francis
Duke University School of Medicine (United States)

Dr. Howard Francis will introduce the Genetics and Hearing Loss Forum by providing a brief overview of medical, surgical and related interventions (e.g. LSL) to date.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the history of medical/surgical interventions related to hearing loss in brief.
  • Recognize the importance of embedding genetics information into their practice.

Part 1

A New Horizon in Newborn Hearing Screening and Follow-Up

Instructional Level: Advanced

Karl White
Utah State University (United States)

When not identified early in life, children with permanent hearing loss lag behind their peers in language, social, and cognitive development. Technological advances over the last 35 years have made it possible for most children with permanent hearing loss to develop similarly to their peers with typical hearing. Recent advances in technology and practice will lead to even better outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Name three technological advances that have dramatically improved early identification and treatment of childhood hearing loss.
  • Describe how primary health care providers can contribute to improving outcomes for children with congenital hearing loss.
  • Name two technological advances that have the potential to further improve outcomes for children with hearing loss.
Addressing Patient Care Based on What We Know Now and With an Ear Towards the Future

Instructional Level: Advanced

Eliot Shearer
Harvard Medical School (United States)

We will discuss the genetic contributions to hearing loss including the most common causes of genetic hearing loss. Methods for genetic testing will be described. Direct impacts of genetic diagnosis on hearing loss care will be given as examples.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the genetic contributions to hearing loss.
  • Describe the impact of genetic diagnosis for hearing loss.
A Model to Identify Genetic Causes of Hearing Loss and Success with Population-based Implementation

Instructional Level: Advanced

Lilian Downie
Victorian Clinical Genetics Service (Australia)

Population-based hearing screening identifies infants who benefit from early intervention. It does not provide answers as to why a baby has hearing loss. Genomic testing can identify the genetic causes of hearing loss using a single test. It provides an explanation for more than half of those diagnosed after birth. Understanding the aetiology results in precision management and is cost effective for health care services.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Understand translating research into population based funded testing.
  • Consider different models of detecting the molecular basis of hearing loss.

Part 2

Complex Conversations with Parents/Caregivers

Instructional Level: Advanced

Mary Beth Goring
John Tracy Center (United States)

When parents receive the difficult news that their child has a hearing loss, their long and serpentine grief journey begins. Genetic testing adds layers of complexity that may include questions about personal identity and self-worth. How news is delivered makes all the difference in how it is received. When professionals approach difficult conversations with empathy and employ strategies that support the flow of communication, they will increase the possibility of establishing and maintaining a trusting working alliance with parents.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Name states of grief of parents of children with hearing loss and the functions that grief states serve.
  • Recognize key approaches of professionals that support a strong and trusting working alliance with parents.
  • Identify practical communication strategies that decrease anxiety and support trust when delivering difficult news.
Guiding Parents Towards Genetic Testing as Part of Audiological Assessment and Counseling

Instructional Level: Advanced

Joan Hewitt
Project Talk (United States)

While many parents may consider genetic testing for family planning, they often have difficulty understanding the benefits for audiological care. Genetic testing can provide significant information that can guide quantification of hearing loss, ongoing management, and interventional planning. Case studies will be presented which highlight the benefits of understanding genetic results with respect to audiological care and management. Ways to discuss with parents the potential benefits of genetic testing for long-term will also be reviewed.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the benefits of using genetic findings to diagnose and treat hearing loss.
  • Describe ways to discuss the interpretation of audiological results with respect to genetic findings with parents and caregivers.
Accelerating Clinical Trial Readiness for Rare Disorders of Hearing Loss: A Global, Patient- Centered Perspective

Instructional Level: Advanced

Karmen Trzupek
Global Genes (United States)

RARE-X, the research program of Global Genes, partners with over 100 rare disease patient advocacy groups to develop data collection and sharing programs that support their research strategies. The RARE-X platform provides a centralized global resource where patients and families collect valuable data and choose how to share that data broadly for research. Is it time for a Global Hearing Loss Registry? An open access, research grade database would increase the availability of data for research and serve as a new paradigm for partnership in clinical trial research – where participation is not limited to those with the resources to travel to existing clinical sites.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Recognize the value of different approaches to patient data collection programs.
  • Describe the role of patient-reported and patient-provided data in accelerating rare disease research.

Part 4

A Panel: Our Response to the Future

Instructional Level: Advanced

Mary McGinnis, Renee Lucero
John Tracy Center (United States)

María Fernanda Hinojosa Valencia, Brianda Campero
Aurea Lab (Mexico)

Jane Madell
Pediatric Audiology Consulting (United States)

Ellyn McCall
Hear Indiana (United States)

Nayela Ahmad
The Nurture Clinic (India)

Karen MacIver Lux

Jessica Bucio

Sound Intuition (Canada)

This diverse panel of professionals, parents and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing will offer a variety of perspectives on how emergent and future innovations related to genetics and gene therapy may affect the lives of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families and/or professional practice.

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  • Identify two take-aways that are immediately applicable to professional practice.
  • Compare and contrast the issues of importance to parents and consumers versus professionals related to emergent and future innovations in hearing loss.
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