Sessions

Part 1

Part 1

Caregiver Coaching in Early Childhood Intervention

(Keynote Presentation)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Dathan Rush

North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (United States)

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Optimizing Auditory Access Across Childhood

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Carol Flexer
The University of Akron (United States)

Carrie Spangler
Summit Educational Service Center (United States)

Cheryl DeConde Johnson
The ADEvantage (United States)

Audiologists are important team members and often the only team member that works with children over time. This presentation will highlight the role of auditory management, technology, and considerations essential for auditory access throughout childhood. An audiologic framework will be proposed using a case study approach.

During this session, participants will:

  • Explain the role of auditory assessments for progress monitoring.
  • Describe two examples that connect managing acoustic accessibility to language and communication in the home and/or school environment to academic instruction and social development.
  • Discuss two technology and/or connectivity issues that must be managed for accessibility to in-person and/or virtual learning.

Explain how development of identity, self-esteem, and agency are critical for wellness, self-advocacy, and successful transitions.

Daily Life Conversations Makes LSL Rich Life

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Karen MacIver-Lux
SoundIntuition (Canada)

The presentation will highlight how the listening, spoken language, and literacy interactions within daily routines and experiences can be adapted according to the age and stage of the child in areas of audition, speech, language, cognition, and communication from infancy to 6.11 years of age.

During this session, participants will:

  • List ways children’s listening, spoken communication, and literacy development are supported.
  • Describe ways in how the child’s daily environment, routines, and experiences can be used to create quantitively and qualitatively rich learning experiences in areas of listening, spoken language, and literacy development.
  • Implement age and stage appropriate strategies that encourage the development of listening, talking, thinking, and literacy skills.
Finding Function: Children with Multiple Diagnosis | Assessment and Intervention of AAC for DHH Children (45-minute sessions)

Instructional Level: Basic

Finding Function: Children with Multiple Diagnosis

Kaytie Cook-Ward
Westwind School Divison, Alberta (Canada)

Lauren Smith-Munkondya
Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind (United States)

Working with a child that has hearing loss and other diagnoses takes a thoughtful team approach to maximize dedicated intervention time. Join the discussion on helping parents prioritize goals, review ways for interdisciplinary teams to identify the best strategies to reach those goals, and write personalized, functional goals to meet the needs of the child.

During this session, participants will:

  • Recognize opportunities for language development and physical development in their daily routines and settings.
  • Review collaboration strategies to prioritize functional goals across settings.
  • Receive ideas and direct instruction on how to write and track written goals for individual education plans.

Assessment and Intervention of AAC for DHH Children

Instructional Level: Basic

Blair Richlin
New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mt. Sinai (United States)

This presentation focuses on patients and families with diagnosed hearing loss and additional disabilities who are assessed for and participated in aural habilitation/rehabilitation and speech/language focusing on development of listening and spoken language skills with support of Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC).

During this session, participants will:

  • Explain how to assess for Alternative and Augmentative Communication in patients who are deaf and hard of hearing.
  • Explain how Alternative and Augmentative Communication can support listening and spoken language skills.
  • Discuss sensory appropriate modes of communication utilized in conjunction with auditory-verbal strategies.
Using Listening Trajectories to Guide Outcomes

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Aleisha Davis, Danielle Lam, Katie Neal, Tess Ansell
The Shepherd Centre (Australia)

Early device fitting presents challenges for measuring and evaluating speech and language skills in infants and young children. This session explores the utility of using a child’s listening trajectory to inform and guide early decisions by parents and professionals to result in optimal listening speech and language outcomes.

During this session, participants will:

  • Use and track a child’s listening trajectory to predict their language outcome.
  • Compare the listening skills of a child with hearing loss to those of typical hearing children using normative data.
  • Identify how a child’s longitudinal view of their functional listening skills can guide access to sound and intervention decisions by families at the earliest opportunity.
Beginning Sounds: Building an Auditory Brain

Instructional Level: Basic

Maki Massone
Advanced Bionics (Argentina)

Nora Gardilcic Venandy
Advanced Bionics (Chile)

We will present a material called CSI LATAM, which can be used in the initial stages of treatment of children with hearing loss. CSI LATAM aims to stimulate the auditory perception of suprasegmental and segmental aspects, cementing the development of listening and spoken language and brain auditory growth.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the characteristics of sounds (suprasegmental and segmental) and the importance in selecting which ones to use and how to present them according to the auditory and linguistic skills that you want to work on.
  • Understand the use of a material that promotes access to these aspects in children with hearing loss in the initial stages of treatment.
  • Build and use the CSI LATAM with infants and children starting an auditory-verbal therapy program.
Many Voices, One Clarke: Journey Toward Equity

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Judy Sexton, Marian Hartblay, Geeta Shandilya
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech (United States)

Critical racial and social issues of recent years prompted Clarke’s call to action as an organization committed to serving all children and families.  This presentation introduces our journey and organizational framework toward gaining cultural competence that began with administrative endorsement and creation of Clarke’s Anti-racism, Inclusion and Diversity (AID) Committee.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify steps to create a conceptual framework and model for addressing anti-racism, inclusion and diversity, and achieving cultural competence.
  • Describe organizational strategies to ensure board, program and faculty/staff participation in the planning, delivery, and evaluation of the core functions of anti-bias educational programming.
  • Identify resources for self-assessment and the improvement of cultural and linguistic competence.
Collaborative Case Conversations (Immersive Session)

Immersive Session - Collaborative Case Conversations

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Teri Ouellette

St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (United States)

Hilda Furmanski

Private Practice (Argentina)

Elizabeth Tyszkiewicz

Private Practice (United Kingdom)

Conversations with a more experienced colleague during a break can be the most professionally valuable thing that happens in a day. We will discuss cases that illustrate challenges, and model structured problem-solving processes. Come and join us as we all try to think outside our individual “boxes”.

During this session, participants will:

  • Use structured joint thinking and discussion in a group setting to move through the process of analyzing a case scenario.
  • Identify and articulate areas of challenge and solutions that can lead to developmental progress in a child and family case scenario.
  • Define clear, achievable, and measurable steps towards desired outcomes.
A Multidisciplinary Approach to Family-Centered Service

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Bridgette Klaus, MaryBeth Goring, Yomna Elsiddig, Lanie Smith
John Tracy Center (United States)

At the John Tracy Clinic, we know there are many factors that must be considered and supported: family dynamics, oral/gross/fine motor development, auditory access, sensory, speech, additional diagnosis, social skills, and cognition. Through this multidisciplinary approach we work together as a team alongside the family and give them hope, guidance, and encouragement.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify important team members in a multidisciplinary team.
  • Explain the benefits of a cohesive team when delivering services for a family.
  • Identify productive ways to collaborate with multiple service providers and families.
Researchers, Authors, Practitioners: Whither the Sociodemographic Data?

Instructional Level: Advanced

Ellen Rhoades
Cross-Cultural Auditory-Verbal Practices (United States)

Nannette Nicholson
Nova Southeastern University (United States)

Rachel Glade
University of Arkansas (United States)

Pertaining to the delivery of listening and spoken language services, many families and their children with hearing loss are underserved/under-represented. Identification and understanding of contributing factors is critical. During this session, findings of hearing health disparities will be shared. Discussing Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) and potential changes will promote understanding. The challenges are great, but professionals can effect change.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe hearing health disparities and the Social Determinants of Health (SDoH).
  • Explain critical sociodemographic data essential for understanding variability in outcomes.
  • Identify the need for changes and the charge for future researchers and authors.
Using Self-Assessment to Enhance Your Practice

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Nanette Thompson
The Listen Foundation (United States)

Kristina Blaiser
Idaho State University (United States)

Providers will complete three sections of the L2L Self-Assessment Tool that relate to increasing auditory access, strengthening early language development, and providing family-centered intervention. Providers will assess their own skills, reflect on families on their caseload, and identify the strategies and key resources.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify their strengths in coaching families to use effective strategies in three target areas.
  • Create an action plan for growth in one of 14 areas for professional development.
  • List resources currently available to assist in professional development.
Telepractice for Pediatric Aural Rehabilitation

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Christina Bloodworth
Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego (United States)

Telepractice has been a long-standing service delivery model. However, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, it forced many practitioners to transition virtually overnight. This session will discuss the elements of telepractice, implementation of adult learning theory to support listening and spoken language skills and utilization of virtual classrooms for aural rehabilitation therapy.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe at least three elements needed for a successful aural rehabilitation session conducted via telepractice.
  • Explain the key principles of the adult learning therapy and how to apply this knowledge into facilitating parent confidence and competence in supporting listening and spoken language skills.
  • Identify at least three resources that can be utilized when creating and implementing virtual classrooms.
Self-Advocacy: Success from Early Intervention and Beyond

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Daniela Berrios, Lynn Miskiel
University of Miami Debbie School (United States)

This presentation provides strategies that can be implemented to support children who are deaf and hard of hearing in developing language and self-advocacy skills across communication settings. Prioritizing language targets creates opportunities for children to be responsible for their language production, allowing them to advocate for themselves from birth and beyond.

During this session, participants will:

  • Define meaningful language activities.
  • Describe self-advocacy skills and how these skills impact positive outcomes for children who are deaf and hard of hearing.
  • Discuss strategies to prioritize language targets, manage communication breakdowns, and create opportunities for self-advocacy at any age.
Supporting Complex Needs through Transdisciplinary Early Intervention

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Inge Kalternbrunn, Christina Petherick
NextSense (Australia)

About 30% to 40% of children with hearing loss have one or more disabilities. This presentation discusses how an evidence-based, family-centred Team Around the Child/Key Worker Model can optimize communication and developmental outcomes in children with hearing loss who have complex needs, and provides strategies for working within a transdisciplinary team.

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand collaborative team practice within a Team Around the Child/Key Worker Model in early intervention.
  • Identify red flags in children with hearing loss’ early communication and development.
  • Describe strategies for working collaboratively and in partnership with the family and transdisciplinary team.
Child-Centered Care: Giving Children a Voice

Instructional Level: Basic

Natalie Comas
Ida Institute (Denmark)

Pediatric audiology’s challenge is to support the 1989 United Nations “Convention on the Rights of the Child” rights in a family-respectful way. Pediatric hearing care professionals can work with the principles of a new model of child-centered care and tools to ensure that children are at the center of hearing care.

During this session, participants will:

  • Define the child-centered care (CCC) model and principles.
  • Discuss how child-centered care (CCC) complements or extends traditional family-centered care (FCC).
  • Implement child-centered care tools in daily practice.
Autism and Hearing Loss: Providing Quality Care

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Michelle Dampf
MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders (United States)

The goals of this presentation are twofold: 1) to improve the quality of audiological care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and for children with comorbid ASD and hearing loss, and 2) to increase audiologists’ knowledge of ASD so referrals can be made for autism evaluations when appropriate.

During this session, participants will:

  • Differentiate the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the symptoms of comorbid ASD and hearing loss.
  • Demonstrate quality care by using evidence-based techniques for pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and comorbid ASD and hearing loss.
  • Evaluate pediatric patients for early signs and symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to make timely referrals.
Language and Socioemotional Development in Early Childhood: The Role of Conversational Turns

(Keynote Presentation)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Esteban Gómez

Fundación América por la Infancia (Chile)

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How Cochlear Cares for Kids: Industry Leading Innovations Support What Matters Most

(Innovations in Hearing; includes Q&A)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Mary Beth O’Sullivan

Cochlear (United States)

From our implant technology with a history of exceptional reliability to our 9-month candidacy indication, Cochlear has over 40 years of industry-leading innovation in products and services. Join us to learn more about the latest in Cochlear’s technology and how it enables children, their families, and professionals to experience care when and where they need it most.

During this session, participants will:

  • Be able to accurately identify Cochlear’s pediatric candidacy indications.
  • Identify Cochlear’s innovative suite of tools and resources that enable recipients and professionals to experience care where and when they need it.
What Does a Cochlear Implant Sounds Like? What We Have Learned from SSD Patients

(Innovations in Hearing; includes Q&A)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Louise Loiselle

MED-EL Corporation (United States)

This presentation covers how insertion angle or electrode length affects the sound quality of an implant. It is based on professor Michael Dorman’s research with SSD patients at the Cochlear Implant Lab at Arizona State University.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the differences in sound quality based on deeper versus shallower insertions of electrode arrays.
  • Describe the causes for the differences in sound quality between deep and shallow insertions of a cochlear implant.
Part 2

Part 2

All About LSLS Certification

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Gayla Guignard
Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (United States)

Do you want to know more about LSLS certification? Have you been wondering about recent or coming changes to the AG Bell Academy’s certification and CEU programs? Plan to participate in this course to learn about current certification requirements and content related to the certification process. Take advantage of this opportunity to also participate in a Question and Answer breakout session towards the end of this course where you will meet others interested in certification. Professionals who are interested in pursuing certification; in the process of completing the requirements towards certification; or who provide LSLS mentoring to professionals are encouraged to attend this session.

During this session, participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of the Principles of Auditory-Verbal practice.
  • Understand the major areas of knowledge and skills of certified LSL Specialists (LSLS Cert. AVT® and LSLS Cert. AVEd®).
  • Identify the academic and professional standards required for LSLS® certification.
  • Recognize the benefits of LSLS certification to families and professionals.
Poster + 5 Minute Podium Presentations
Instructional Level: Intermediate
A Genetic Cause of Auditory Neuropathy

Tera Quigley
Decibel Therapeutics (United States)

Several companies are developing novel treatments for individuals with specific forms of hearing loss, including auditory neuropathy caused by otoferlin protein deficiency. The Amplify™ genetic testing program is one of the sponsored, no-charge genetic testing for children with auditory neuropathy. Find out more about eligibility for this program here: https://www.invitae.com/en/amplify.

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand several companies are developing novel treatments for individuals with auditory neuropathy caused by otoferlin (OTOF) protein deficiency.
  • Explain that genetic testing must be completed to determine if OTOF protein deficiency is the cause of an auditory neuropathy diagnosis.
  • Identify and access a sponsored, no-cost genetic testing service for children with auditory neuropathy.

 

LSL When the Prognosis is Unknown

Ellen Thomas, Gabrielle Watson
University of Michigan (United States)

Experienced listening and spoken language (LSL) practitioners routinely provide prognoses regarding LSL outcomes. This talk uses two cases of a rare genetic disorder to look at the management of the LSL journey when etiology makes for an unchartered LSL path.

During this session, participants will:

  • Explain why ongoing diagnostic intervention is critical.
  • Recognize when the typical intervention path won’t work.
  • Identify two objective that can help monitor LSL practice when the outcome is not as expected.

 

Technologies, Parents and Therapists: All Together

Cilmara Levy
ISCMPS (Brazil)

As multiplier agents, teachers need to build a base with speech-therapist students, as they will be the closest therapists who will mentor parents of children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the support needs and practical activities for undergraduate students in speech therapy.
  • List the benefits of student training for clinical practice.
  • Define the main principles of hearing and language stimulation.

 

Japanese Monosyllabic Errors with HA and CI

Shujiro Minami
National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center (Japan)

To reframe the criteria for pediatric cochlear implants (CIs) in Japan, we investigated monosyllabic recognition errors at the time of school entry in deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) children with hearing aids (HAs) or CIs in early childhood

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the commonalities and differences between children with HAs and children with CIs.
  • Identify the similar articulation style.
  • Identify formant transition as the causes of the recognition errors.

 

Impact of Family Participation on Language Development

Amy Cantu, Kelsey McKey
Texas Hearing Institute (United States)

Ronald Vilela
Texas Children’s Hospital (United States)

Austin Huang
Baylor College of Medicine (United States)

Parent participation is a vital factor that affects patient outcomes in listening and spoken language (LSL). Family involvement was described using the Family Participation Rating Scale and compared to patients’ progress over time. Data points between 2017 and 2021 will be presented and factors that affect parent participation will be reviewed.

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand the importance of parent participation in language progress and overall outcomes of children enrolled in LSL services.
  • Identify specific areas of family support that may lead to successful language outcomes in children with hearing loss.
  • Learn measures of family participation that can be implemented in their clinic.

 

Benefits of Parent Panel and Patient Navigator

Ashley Milinichik, Daniel King
Duke University Hospital (United States)

The success of a comprehensive, family-centered pediatric hearing program requires a multidisciplinary team. This session will provide details about how patient navigator(s) and parent panel members (families of children with hearing loss) can be included within multidisciplinary teams to help improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction.

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand the role of the patient navigator in a pediatric hearing program.
  • Understand the importance of parent/patient input into program development.
  • Identify keys to co-working with families and teams via parent panel and patient navigator.

 

PEACH: Nueva herramienta en español                          

(Presented in Spanish)

Sofia Bravo Torres
Hospital Dr. Luis Calvo Mackenna (Chile)

This session provides an overview of Parental Assessment Scale of Children’s Auditory/Oral Performance (PEACH), a tool validated in Spanish.

During this session, participants will:

  • Increase knowledge of questionnaire adaptation.
  • Learn about a transversal tool to evaluate children with hearing loss.
  • Promote the importance of cultural adaptation of listening skills tests.

 

EI for Mild, Moderate and Unilateral HL

Gillian Lalonde
Surrey Place (Canada)

Maria Emilia (Mila) de Melo
Toronto Public Health/Toronto Infant Hearing Program (Canada)

The Virtual “Hear” 2 Talk program is a family-centered service for children with unilateral or bilateral mild/moderate permanent hearing loss in the better ear. It promotes collaborative practice among all members of the child’s team, increases parental self-efficacy skills, and meets the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention 1-3-6 benchmarks.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe a family-centered, virtual EI program for children identified with unilateral or bilateral mild/moderate permanent hearing loss and whose parents have chosen spoken language outcomes.
  • Summarize parents’ perspectives following participation in a virtual early intervention service.
  • Examine the impact of an early intervention program on parental self-efficacy.

 

Birth to Three Outcomes in LSL Grant

Emily Robbins
Norton Children’s ENT and Audiology (United States)

This presentation analyzes data collected on children ages birth to three with identified hearing loss receiving listening and spoken language intervention via telehealth. Families received coaching from a speech-language pathologist and/or developmental interventionist. Data was collected upon initial evaluation and tracked monthly over 1.5 years.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe data collection tools used to track progress.
  • Identify key outcome differences between unilateral and bilateral users.
  • Identify the relationship between wear-time and outcomes.

 

Overcoming Remoteness in Early Intervention Service Delivery

Carolyn Hawrish
BC Family Hearing Resource Society (Canada)

Effectively delivering services in remote areas remains a challenge for early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs. We examine a case study of innovative collaboration between two agencies to provide excellent EHDI services in the Yukon, a remote Canadian territory. This partnership is helping to ensure access to appropriate intervention even in extremely remote areas.

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand the challenges to EHDI program service delivery in extremely remote areas.
  • Identify the ways in which two early intervention programs established a partnership to provide specialized service to extremely remote DHH clients.
  • Identify key elements that are enabling these two early intervention partners to foster their collaborations and diversify the practices they are using in their service delivery.

 

Project VOICE Vocational Education and SLP Training

Isabel Costa
University of Aveiro (Portugal)

The education of speech-language pathologists (SLP) and other professionals working with families is crucial to reach spoken language through listening. This translational project aims to raise the bar on Romenian SLP education and parental participation with children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about listening for spoken language.
  • How to do provide educational training.
  • How to improve parental involvement.

 

Preschool Children’s Vocabulary during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Ronda Rufsvold
OPTION Schools (United States)

Mona Oster
Listen and Talk (United States)

Jennifer Coto, Ivette Cejas
University of Miami (United States)

Similar to the rest of the country, OPTION programs transitioned in the Spring 2020 to emergency tele-intervention services. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vocabulary growth of preschool-aged children who are DHH enrolled in OPTION programs throughout the COVID-19 pandemic given the transition to tele-intervention services.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the vocabulary growth of preschool-aged children who are DHH who attended specialized programs throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Summarize how the results inform practices for practitioners working with children who are DHH who are utilizing listening and spoken language.
  • Identify the profiles of children who maintained or showed growth in their vocabulary scores during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Preschooler’s DM Benefit in Adverse Listening Situations       

Monika-Maria Oster
Listen and Talk (United States)

Children ages 3 to 5 years old with hearing loss benefit from DM technology when listening to quiet and conversational speech in noise and through zoom.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify adverse listening situations that preschoolers encounter.
  • Participants will describe the benefit preschoolers gain from the DM system in different adverse listening situations.
  • Participants will identify limitations to the data presented.

 

Beneficio de Rehabilitación Auditiva en adulta poslocutiva

(Presented in Spanish)

Elba Roxana Figueroa Núñez del Prado, Yovana Fajardo Chumpitaz
Centro Fonoaudiológico y de Aprendizaje FON-AP (Peru)

This case study is of a 40-year-old post lingual patient with severe-profound bilateral, sudden onset hearing loss. At 8 years of age the patient experienced sudden onset hearing loss without access to speech sounds until 32 years of age when the patient received a unilateral cochlear implant. Hearing access combined with CI and therapy resulted in improved auditory, cognitive, listening comprehension, speech and language skills.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about the etiology and auditory development of the patient.
  • Understand the process of auditory rehabilitation of the patient.
  • See evidence that the patient’s auditory rehabilitation has a favorable impact on their quality of life, family, social and work performance.

 

Consenso profesional para intervenciones interdisciplinarias sustentables

(Present in Spanish)

Gloria Garcia Del Solar, Javiera  Drapela
Facultad de Medicina Clinica Alemana Universidad del Desarrollo (Chile)

Romina Piccione
MED-EL Latam (Argentina)

Andrea Bravo
MED-EL Latam (Colombia)

This presentation seeks to share with the audience the importance of implementing an informed evidence search that allows users to access opportunities that ensure the promotion, protection and maintenance of interventions that maximize well-being through action guides agreed upon by experts.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe principles of promotion, protection and maintenance of interventions.
  • Identify the assessment of the relevance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures delivered by doctors, audiologists and rehabilitators to the proposals of a clinical guide.
  • Discuss the level of agreement established by the specialists regarding the clinical usefulness of the proposed procedures in the pre, peri and post surgical stages.

 

LSLS Certification Process in a Non-English-Speaking Community    

Bruna Youssef, Marianni Costa Master
Instituto Escuta (Brazil)

Maria Emilia (Mila) de Melo
Toronto Public Health/Toronto Infant Hearing Program (Canada)

The LSLS certification process, although rewarding, is an arduous learning process and can be facilitated if the mentor is fluent in the same language as the candidate and knowledgeable about his/her culture. This poster will describe the LSLS certification journey of professionals in a non-English-speaking community.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the ongoing LSLS certification journey of professionals in a non-English-speaking community.
  • Identify challenges faced by non-English speaking professionals going through the LSLS candidacy process.
  • Report creative ways to overcome or minimize the challenges experienced.
Parenting Philosophies for the Modern LSL Child | Taking on Tantrums: LSL Behavior Management (45-minute presentations)

Parenting Philosophies for the Modern LSL Child

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Sarah Radlinski, Sarah Spencer
Auditory-Verbal Center, Inc. (United States)

This session will navigate popular modern parenting philosophies, such as Montessori and RIE, through a listening and spoken language (LSL) framework. Participants will explore what may conflict with LSL principles, while also discovering strengths of each philosophy to apply to intervention. Respect for parenting preferences is encouraged while also aligning with current LSL research.

During this session, participants will:

  • Effectively counsel families on how to uphold the principles of their chosen parenting philosophy, while still integrating LSL strategies and providing the communication opportunities their deaf and hard of hearing child needs to thrive with spoken language.
  • Gain a deeper understanding of the intent behind each targeted parenting philosophy’s core beliefs.
  • Recognize the areas within each philosophy that seemingly conflict with LSL principles, and discuss how each parenting philosophy can still coexist with LSL intervention, given some adaptation.

Taking on Tantrums: LSL Behavior Management

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Sarah Radlinski, Sarah Spencer, Sarah Hudgins
Auditory-Verbal Center, Inc. (United States)

Effective behavior management extends beyond simply eliciting cooperation during listening and spoken language intervention sessions and is critical to a child’s overall social-emotional development. This session will identify the neurodevelopmental etiology behind behaviors, such as tantrums, that are viewed as undesirable. The most impactful positive discipline strategies for long-term success will be explored.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the neurodevelopmental source of behaviors such as tantrums and explain why behavior problems may be more prevalent in deaf and hard of hearing children.
  • Identify why some traditional behavior management strategies (time out, ignoring, bribes, threats etc.) are ineffective long-term.
  • Describe alternative behavior management strategies following positive discipline principles that are both practical and actionable during listening and spoken language intervention.
Real-Time Embedded Coaching: Parent and Professional Perspectives

Instructional level: Intermediate

Betsy Moog Brooks, Amanda Rudge
Moog Center for Deaf Education (United States)

This presentation will report on the perspectives of real-time embedded coaching as an approach to early intervention as reported by early intervention providers and caregivers of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Findings will include: establishing relationships/rapport, developing mutual respect/trust, increasing caregiver confidence, and implementing real-time embedded coaching.

During this session, participants will:

  • List key elements for implementing real-time embedded coaching.
  • Describe the components of real-time embedded coaching.
  • Describe the aspects of the coach-coachee relationship which are significant to increasing caregiver confidence.
Using Strengths: Coaching Professionals, Creating Intervention Change

Instructional level: Intermediate

Ashley Garber
LSL Learning Partners, LLC (United States)

Becky Clem
Cook Children’s Medical Center (United States)

Listening and spoken language practice has long involved mentoring of professionals seeking certification. The speakers make the case for a shift toward strengths-based coaching (SBC). Using SBC, we see changes in clinician behavior that directly impact intervention practice, thus the child’s spoken language outcomes. Speakers will use videos and scenarios to demonstrate coaching strategies.

During this session, participants will:

  • Evaluate core strengths-based coaching concepts that impact clinicians’ use of listening and spoken language strategies in intervention sessions.
  • Script a coaching conversation based on a scenario using strength-based coaching strategies.
  • Compare changes in clinician behavior in listening and spoken language intervention sessions pre- and post-coaching.
Early Communication and Theory of Mind

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Gary Morgan

Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (Spain)

This talk outlines the current research on theory of mind (ToM) development, the role of communication and language in supporting ToM, and the areas of strengths and difficulties demonstrated in studies of children who are deaf and hard of hearing. The review will cover early research as well as more recent approaches. The talk will finish with some reflections on family intervention and ToM.

During this session, participants will:

  • How ToM enables children to understand the world.
  • The role of early communication for ToM and language.
  • Differences in development in children who are deaf and hard of hearing and possible remediation.
Ready Steady Think: Executive Function Skills

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Danielle Lam, Joanna McAdam, Aleisha Davis, Jen Whiteway

The Shepherd Centre (Australia)

Executive function (EF) skills underpin learning, language processing, and social cognition. For children with hearing loss, EF skills play a key role in reaching positive outcomes and are known to be at risk for this population. Preschool years are a key time to develop these skills through play based activities.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe executive function skills.
  • Identify barriers to development of executive function in children with hearing loss.
  • Use new ideas to strengthen the development of executive function in everyday activities.
Coaching Parents for Success: Telepractice and In-Person

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Noel Kenely

Auditory Verbal UK (United Kingdom)

Is parent coaching different when delivering sessions in person or via telepractice? Join us to explore the outcomes of a professional development exercise carried out at Auditory Verbal UK to evaluate differences in coaching techniques used during in-person versus telepractice sessions using the Therapist Parent Interaction Coding System.

During this session, participants will:

  • Be able to use an objective measure for personal reflection on the use of different parent-coaching techniques.
  • Be able to identify potential differences in coaching techniques between in-person and telepractice LSLS sessions.
  • Be able to use a framework for personal reflection and/or in mentoring on the use of parent coaching in LSLS sessions.
Tips for Your Toolbox (Immersive Session)

Immersive Session - Tips for Your Toolbox

Tips for Your Toolbox

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Facilitated by Gayla Guignard

Daily teaching and/or therapy can drain even the most creative professional! This session will connect you to professionals around the world collaboratively sharing their best ideas on how to teach and connect with children and families, both in person and virtually. Drop in and pick up some “Tips” to use immediately in your practice!

During this session, participants will:

  • Recall at least three new strategies, techniques, or resources for intervention.
  • Relate one new idea for therapy to use within the next two weeks.
  • Explain how a demonstrated technique might be applied in their own practice.

 

Taking On Virtual Learning

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Alexandria Mestres

University of Miami (United States)

A growing shortage of deaf and hard of hearing teachers have left many children with hearing loss in the mainstream without support from a qualified professional. Virtual education may be a unique way to provide it. This presentation will demonstrate some of the possibilities a virtual platform has to offer.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify some strategies for using a virtual platform for DHH support for children with hearing loss in the mainstream.
  • Identify some resources for virtual learning when providing support for DHH students in the mainstream.

 

Say It Again! Books with Repeatable Lines

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Chrissie Barcelona, Susan Schmitt

DePaul School for Hearing and Speech (United States)

This presentation will discuss the importance of books with repeatable lines and give you tips on creating activities to go along with them, as well as developing listening and spoken language skills for the child.

During this session, participants will:

  • Explain the importance of books with repeatable lines and how they help to facilitate listening and spoken language skills in children who are deaf and hard of hearing.
  • Create effective lesson plans and activities using books with repeatable lines.

 

Listen With Lynn

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Lynn A. Wood

Auditory Verbal Center of Wheaton (United States)

Are you looking for activities to grow listening and spoken language skills that are fun, easy, and stress-free? You’re at the right place! Listen With Lynn resources complement early intervention, auditory-verbal therapy, school-based teacher of the deaf/hard of hearing lessons, and auditory rehabilitation. They are downloadable and available on numerous online platforms.

During this session, participants will:

  • Summarize the variety of listening and spoken language activities, games, tools, and resources available to families, teens/adults, and professionals.
  • Explain how to access and download Listen With Lynn™ resources available on numerous online platforms.

 

Containing Teletherapy: What’s Inside The Box?

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Alexis Terndrup

Weingarten Children’s Center (United States)

During teletherapy with young listeners, there are often unpredictable situations that make it difficult to coach. It’s time to get out that toolbox, laundry basket, bin, plastic egg, cereal box, or grocery bag. We can always work on listening, language, and cognition with containers! Also, remember that containers are everywhere!

During this session, participants will:

  • Demonstrate two techniques for using containers in caregiver coaching teletherapy.
  • Describe to a caregiver the strategy of keeping household items or toys in containers for listening and language practice.

 

Freely Available Resources to Support Multilingual Families

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Donna Sperandio

MED-EL Medical Electronics (Austria)

In the past decade, the listening and spoken language approach has reached further into communities and countries where languages other than English are spoken. This presentation will provide participants with access to free, quality, research-based materials in multiple languages. Digital materials including videos, downloads, and apps will be described.

During this session, participants will:

  • Perform searches for blogs and websites to access materials in multiple languages.
  • Identify two video series showing rehabilitation techniques.

 

Reduce, Reuse, Replay!

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Meaghan Whalen

MUSC (United States)

Questions about the best toys/materials for auditory-verbal therapy practice at home is a common concern from parents. This presentation will encourage therapists to collaborate with families to be inventive with household items the family is already using to transform them into easy and engaging tools for auditory and language development!

During this session, participants will:

  • Expand their inventory of activities and coach families to be creative with everyday items to support auditory development.
  • Consider how items the family has direct access to during routines can be used/modified to create affordable and engaging materials.

 

Book in Spanish on Auditory-Verbal Practice*

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Lilian Flores-Beltran

Med-El LATAM (Mexico)

Maria Fernanda Hinojosa

Aurea Lab (Mexico)

Hearing loss is a neurological emergency, the most common disability in newborns. Through listening, the brain accesses all the sounds of speech. In this presentation, the authors will show how this book will help readers provide the best auditory-verbal practice in an integral way in Spanish.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the importance of early identification of hearing loss and interdisciplinary work through auditory-verbal practice.
  • Describe the contents of the book “Hearing Loss in Childhood: A Look from Auditory-Verbal Practice”.

*This presentation will be in English; Spanish oral translation and English and Spanish captions will also be provided.

Hear at Home, MEDEL Tool for Adults

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Claudia Sepúlveda

Private Practice (Chile)

Hear at Home, MEDEL Home Training Tool for Adults with Hearing Loss, is a structured program in speech perception that helps the person with hearing loss to adjust their new hearing aid, having the benefit of offering a familiar interlocutor in practice.

During this session, participants will:

  • Learn about a new way to help adult cochlear implants with the practice of receiving speech, using family and/or friends as interlocutors.
  • Be able to provide family members and/or friends with learning new strategies to improve their ability to speak and communicate with people with hearing loss.

 

Advice through a Story for Cochlear Implants

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Eliana Fredes

Servicio de Logopedia Oír Pensar Hablar del Centro Auditivo OirT (Spain)

We will present how we help children/families go through the process of receiving a cochlear implant and learning to listen through a story and dramatization. If children/families know and can anticipate what will happen to them, they will experience this process with less stress and anxiety. Story and hearing aids are manufactured by us.

During this session, participants will

  • Demonstrate how we use this tool in our speech therapy service for advice and support to parents and children who will go through this process.
  • Explain how, through stories, we can accompany families through the process of cochlear implant of their child.

 

Book in Spanish on Auditory-Verbal Practice*

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Lilian Flores-Beltran

Med-El LATAM (Mexico)

Maria Fernanda Hinojosa

Aurea Lab (Mexico)

Hearing loss is a neurological emergency, the most common disability in newborns. Through listening, the brain accesses all the sounds of speech. In this presentation, the authors will show how this book will help readers provide the best auditory-verbal practice in an integral way in Spanish.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the importance of early identification of hearing loss and interdisciplinary work through auditory-verbal practice.
  • Describe the contents of the book “Hearing Loss in Childhood: A Look from Auditory-Verbal Practice”.

*This presentation will be in Spanish; English oral translation and English and Spanish captions will also be provided.

Children with Hearing Loss in Mainstream Schools

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Hilda Furmanski

Private Practice (Argentina)

The challenges of a child with hearing loss are not directly perceived or measurable and are often underestimated in mainstream schools. This session attempts to describe the challenges in accessing information and compensatory strategies to improve children’s performance in school.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify the challenges of children with hearing loss in mainstream schools.
  • Identify challenges for schools and teachers who have children with hearing loss in their classes.
  • Explain possible strategies to promote children’s performance in the school environment.
Unilateral is Not Uniform

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Melissa Jensen, Logan Horner, Ana Sei

Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children (United States)

Since universal newborn hearing screening, the number of infants diagnosed with unilateral hearing loss has dramatically increased. However, the needs of these children vary. In this session, five profiles of unilateral hearing loss are discussed. They’re based on etiology of hearing loss and the amplification/habilitation that Sunshine Cottage’s Parent-Infant Program has adopted.

During this session, participants will:

  • Categorize unilateral hearing loss based on the five profiles presented.
  • Identify unique aspects of each profile of unilateral hearing loss and how they impact amplification and therapeutic needs.
  • Develop amplification and intervention plans for very young children with unilateral hearing loss based on the profiles presented.
Adolescents, Cochlear Implants, Music, and Speech

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Jayne Simpson Allen

Private Practice (Australia)

Recent investigations in auditory neuroscience reveal that individuals who are engaged in music training develop brain changes that promote an adaptive auditory system. This session discusses the development of listening and speech perception of two adolescents with profound hearing loss through their discovery of music, beginning with a Spotify playlist!

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe the application of music in listening and spoken language sessions with adolescents.
  • Explain the relative position of music in the auditory hierarchy.
  • Organize a sequential musical list for listening and spoken language intervention.
Challenges and Changes (Immersive Presentation)

Immersive Session - Challenges and Changes to Systems and Services

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Facilitated by Teri Ouellette

St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (United States)

Bethany Colson

Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education (United States)

Mariana Barquet

Indiana Chapter of Hands & Voices (United States)

Lindy Powell

St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf-Indiana (United States)

Maria Fernanda Hinojosa

Aurea Lab (Mexico)

Pedro Brás da Silva

Center of Deafness, Vertigo and Tinnitus of Lusíadas Porto Hospital (Portgual)

Maria Emilia (Mila) de Melo

Toronto Public Health/Toronto Infant Hearing Program (Canada)

We each have a responsibility to underserved children, now and in the future. If we face challenges as opportunities, we can expand the potential for all. This panel will share experiences in overcoming obstacles in their practice or regional services. Envision a new way to impact future listening and spoken language families!

During this session, participants will:

  • Compare their local issues to those presented to identify areas of concern and determine one take-away concern that can be addressed in the coming year.
  • Describe three key collaborations to support advancing services where they practice.
  • Identify an area of collaboration to target in order to advance the services in their region.
The Road to Hearing Equity

(Keynote Presentation)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Susan Emmett
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States)

View Session

Applying LSL Strategies to Itinerant Teaching

Instructional Level: Basic

Kristen Temprine

Colonial Intermediate Unit 20, Pennsylvania (United States)

Deanna Magda

Bergen County Special Services School District (United States)

A spotlight on practical applications of the listening and spoken language strategies for the itinerant caseload. The focus will be on integrating auditory skills into the curriculum, and supporting these skills in a flexible manner consistent with itinerant teaching.

During this session, participants will:

  • Apply listening and spoken language strategies to a variety of grade levels.
  • Integrate listening skills into the curriculum.
  • Apply coaching strategies to general education teachers.
Good Friend Formula (Developing a Relational Growth Mindset)

Instructional Level: Basic

Rosemary Gardner

Private Organization (Ireland)

Lorraine Murphy

Our New Ears Support Group (Ireland)

We examine the link between a ‘theory of mind’ and a ‘growth mindset’, suggesting that combining these two concepts is highly fruitful for our children. We call this a ‘relational growth mindset’, suggesting these concepts in concert help better understanding of oneself and others and develop a growth mindset in interaction with others.

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand the concept of relational growth mindset.
  • Grasp how this mindset might help guide a child’s interaction with others, recognizing that developing a relational growth mindset can help a child not only build good friendships but also resilience, confidence, and self-belief.
  • Put the theory into practice.
Development of the Ling-Madell-Hewitt Test Battery | Clinical Application of LMH 10 Sound Test (30-minute presentations)

Development of the Ling-Madell-Hewitt Test Battery

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Jane Maddel

Pediatric Audiology Consulting (United States)

The Ling-Madell-Hewitt (LMH) quick test is intended to provide additional information missing from the Ling Six Sound Test. The battery includes the quick test, from detection through repetition, to repetition of all phonemes, through the medial consonant test. Discussion will include interpretation of the test results.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe why the LMH test battery was developed.
  • Will be able to perform the LMH quick test and interpret the results.
  • Discuss how to proceed with the other components of the LMH test battery.

Clinical Application of LMH 10 Sound Test

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Inge Kaltenbrunn, Kylie Chisholm

NextSense (Australia)

The new LMH 10 Sound Test provides increased screening coverage across the low, mid, and high frequencies. This presentation discusses how this test is clinically applied across different age groups, degrees of hearing loss, hearing device users, and languages spoken at home. Recommendations are made to support effective clinical application.

During this session, participants will:

  • Understand the LMH 10 Sound Test as a screening tool.
  • Describe the advantages and limitations of the test for different age groups, hearing device users, and languages spoken at home.
  • Outline factors to consider in test administration and interpretation of results to support effective clinical application.
Remote Care and a Team-Based Approach: Outcomes and Effects on the Family

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Jennifer Coto

University of Miami (United States)

This session will discuss the results of a remote CI programing study and implementation of a team-based virtual clinic model. Data on clinical implications and benefits of patient and family outcomes will be reviewed. Current practices and how to implement a similar model in your practice will also be discussed.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe a protocol for remote cochlear implant programming and multidisciplinary team approach to care in a pediatric cochlear implant population.
  • Identify the benefits of remote care on family burden and mental health.
  • Discuss feasibility and satisfaction for remote programming and multi-disciplinary team care.
The Perfect Pair

(Innovations in Hearing; includes Q&A)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Blair Richlin

Advanced Bionics (United States)

Students have access to digital textbooks, personal devices, collaborative cloud-based tools, and interactive whiteboards. Children with hearing loss need the perfect pair to listen effortlessly in every situation. Learn how Advanced Bionics Sky CI Marvel helps school-age children connect to peers, academics, and community. Discover resources that pair with technology to help children excel with listening and spoken language learning.

During this session, participants will:

  • Describe two specific Sky CI Marvel technologies and each respective benefit it brings to a school age child.
  • Participants will name and describe how to access resources that can be used in family-based intervention, therapy, and at home to promote listening, spoken language, musical brain development, and literacy.
Foundations for Literacy: A Research-Based Early Intervention that Improves Outcomes for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

(Keynote Presentation) 

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Amy Lederberg
Georgia State University (United States)

View Session

Building A Parent Nation

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Dana Suskind

University of Chicago (United States)

Yolie Flores

Parent Nation (United States)

Hilda Furmanski

Private Practice (Argentina)

Teri Ouellette

St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (United States)

Anita Grover

Auditory Verbal UK (United Kingdom)

Julie Swaim

AG Bell Association (United States)

This presentation will discuss the importance of building a parent nation—a society that shares in the responsibility of raising children. Dr. Suskind will make the case that society has abdicated its responsibility to families, adopting policies and norms that directly conflict with the science of early childhood development and make it incredibly challenging for any parent to fulfill their role as their child’s first and most important teacher. The consequences of this abdication are profound and tragic, leading many families to struggle—in ways small and large—and robbing many children of the opportunity to reach their full potential. Never one to stop at identifying a problem, Dr. Suskind also offers a roadmap for mitigating this injustice and building a society that enables parents and caregivers to meet the needs of young children.

During this session, participants will:

  • Identify the obstacles facing parents in society at large.
  • Identify the ways in which those challenges negatively impact children’s foundational brain development.
  • Outline a blueprint for a path forward, using neuroscience to identify the ways in which society can and should support parents.
Keynote Presentations
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